Author Topic: Murano glass fish, purple net pattern, lots of gold -- Barovier & Toso?  (Read 1490 times)

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Offline rocco

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Lovely Murano glass fish I bought today, height 23 cm, weight 1.7 kg (quite heavy for its size), purple net pattern with large air bubbles inbetween and lots of gold; pedestal base with ground and polished rim.

After searching the web quite a bit for Murano fish, I came to the conclusion it might be by Barovier & Toso -- their animal sculptures seem to be the only ones with those black and white eyes...

>> This fish and >> this duck look very similar in style (apart from the base), >> this pheasant has similar colours, too.
The technique seems to be called "Graffito" -- I found two vases in the exact same pattern (>> Link 1, >> Link 2).

Can my attribtution be confirmed? And am I right in thinking it was probably made in the 1950s?

Thanks!
Michael


Offline rosieposie

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Re: Murano glass fish, purple net pattern, lots of gold -- Barovier & Toso?
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2012, 10:04:18 PM »
I thought this technique was called Fenicio? Barovier and Toso used it a lot.  I am not certain, but the word might imply 'window' as you can see through the network of glass pattern on the exterior.
A lovely piece, and that is from someone who doesn't collect fish. :)
Rosie.

When all's said and done, there's nothing left to say or do.  Roger McGough.


Offline rocco

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Re: Murano glass fish, purple net pattern, lots of gold -- Barovier & Toso?
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2012, 01:42:43 PM »
Thanks, Rosie! :)

I am not very good when it comes to Murano techniques; "Graffito" seems to be a range by Barovier & Toso from the 1950s, designed by Ercole Barovier (maybe similar techniques were given different names by other companies?)

I found a thread on the fossilfly forum, with a happy Barovier duck in a very similar style to my fish, kindly identified by Anita: >> Link
So if nobody objects, I don't have much doubt that my attribution is correct.

When it comes to glass animals, fish are my favourite -- so no competition between us, Rosie :-*

Michael


Offline rosieposie

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Re: Murano glass fish, purple net pattern, lots of gold -- Barovier & Toso?
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2012, 02:09:48 PM »
Hi Michael, I don't see your markings as being quite the same as Anita's duck.
Hers are glass stripes that have been drawn through (in the manner of the way we draw a fork through icing on a cake, so the pattern is dragged).
Look carefully at your lovely fish and compared with the duck, the pattern is quite different with the lines being added to form separate windows. Both techniques give the ability to see through to the underneath layers of glass, but your is like looking through a frame, hence my feeling that it could be Fenecio.
I am off to do more research, because I am now keen to know for sure.
Rosie.

When all's said and done, there's nothing left to say or do.  Roger McGough.


Offline rocco

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Re: Murano glass fish, purple net pattern, lots of gold -- Barovier & Toso?
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2012, 08:48:01 PM »
Rosie, you are right that it isn't the same pattern (though a similar technique) in the duck and my fish.
I just wanted to point out that both are likely by the same maker...

The auction I linked to before (showing a vase with identical decoration) cites the Heiremans book, so "Graffito" should be the right name I guess. Leslie Jackson in her "20th century factory glass" also mentions this range, but doesn't give a more detailed description of the technique...

Michael


Offline rosieposie

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Re: Murano glass fish, purple net pattern, lots of gold -- Barovier & Toso?
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2012, 11:44:13 PM »
I have spent a couple of hours on this one this evening Michael, and found both techniques described as both Graffito amd Fenicio ('scuse the previous typo) so now I am even more confused,  because if you google Graffito, there indeed is the vase you mention, but also an elongated  fish with the 'drawn through' glass threads... so could it be that the terms are interchangeable, ie., that both terms can mean either or both techniques?

Looks like I will have to carry on looking, because at the moment, I am taking a great interest in glass terms and techniques... hey ho!  On with the search.
Rosie.

When all's said and done, there's nothing left to say or do.  Roger McGough.


Offline langhaugh

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Re: Murano glass fish, purple net pattern, lots of gold -- Barovier & Toso?
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2012, 12:36:38 AM »
It's definitely not fenicio, and I'm  not sure it's graffito. Googling terms is risky if you're looking for accuracy. It's better to check reference books, the list of terms on the Barovier site, or the Loschs site, although even that isn't 100%.

I think that B & T is a reasonable attribution for this very nice fish.

David
My glass collection is at https://picasaweb.google.com/lasilove


Offline rosieposie

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Re: Murano glass fish, purple net pattern, lots of gold -- Barovier & Toso?
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2012, 12:52:38 AM »
Hi David, that is so interesting, because I had just checked the Barovier Glass Makers terms site and it would seem that Graffito and Fenicio are both names (interchangeable) for the same  technique, the combing of lines of molten glass as I previously described. 
Where I was mistaken was in thinking that Fenicio referred to Fenestra meaning window... it does not, apparently it means Phoenician! It seems this combing technique was first used by them. You learn something new every day! 
So it seems we are still looking for the correct term for your fab fish decoration Michael... but at least we can rule out these two.
Rosie.

When all's said and done, there's nothing left to say or do.  Roger McGough.


Offline rosieposie

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Re: Murano glass fish, purple net pattern, lots of gold -- Barovier & Toso?
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2012, 01:17:45 AM »
Might this Barovier term describe the patterning technique used on your fish Michael?

'MORĚSE O MORISÉTTE
A traditional Murano decoration consisting of an undulating design, made by applying a thread of hot glass to a surface and "pinching" it with BORSELLE DA PISSEGAR. In practical terms, is actually comprises a twist of glass which is placed on the object being made and fashioned into the characteristic undulating pattern. '
Rosie.

When all's said and done, there's nothing left to say or do.  Roger McGough.


Offline TxSilver

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Re: Murano glass fish, purple net pattern, lots of gold -- Barovier & Toso?
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2012, 01:30:18 AM »
Yes, the fish is Barovier & Toso. I would love to put it in the Murano Zoo, Michael. If you would like to have it in the zoo, just email your full name to me and I'll give you credit.

Your fish has perfect examples of the eyes Barovier & Toso were famous for. The look like glazed black pupils on white glass. I don't know how they achieved the look, but it gives so much life to the animals that have eyes like this.

As for graffito -- there are several different looks to graffito, so I wouldn't want to say yes or no. It is not fenicio, though. Fenicio is applied to the surface, then combed. From what I've seen, the fenecio decoration is sometimes left on the surface or it can be cased. The canes in this fish look more like are formed and suspended in the glass to me.

I am open to what graffito is. Fratelli Toso graffito looks like random canes snaking around inside glass. Some looks like spider webs. Others look like the duck in the link. What makes something graffito, I don't know. And anytime I talk technique, I wind up in trouble.
Anita
San Marcos Art Glass
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