Glass Discussion & Research. No ID requests here please. > British & Irish Glass

Breaking News Nailsea / Bristol hat found in charity shop in Bristol for 1.50

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johnphilip:
Hi Mike excuse my ignorance but what makes it Nailsea i had always thought Nailsea was striped glass ?
 I thought those hats were usually known as friggers .   DOHHHH JP

flying free:
Well I didn't like to ask, but now JP has I'm popping my head above the parapet to also ask how this was determined please?
I thought Nailsea glass was full of little blobs of coloured glass like this
http://bottledigging.org.uk/Topic129946-12-1.aspx
But on scrolling down there is a dark green jug that doesn't appear to have any blobs in.  And how do you determine whether it really is from Nailsea or Bristol...I find this whole area very confusing :-\
m

chopin-liszt:
It could be accurately described as coming into the category of being a frigger.
It's still a hat though.  ;D

Lustrousstone:
I think the important thing to remember is that the Bristol glass industry (i.e., not window glass) didn't continue in any quantity long into the 19th century (there's something in Chance Expressions), so anything genuine is really pretty old. This looks more Victorian.

Pulled feather stuff can sometimes be Bristol, as can some (very little) enamelling.

David E:
Production of Nailsea glass did not continue after 1874, but the works were leased from the owners from about 1855:


--- Quote ---From 1855, the works were leased to Samuel Bowen. ... he was bought out by James Hartley ... he later sold the works to Chance Brothers.
Chance Expressions, p.4

--- End quote ---

It is also worth noting that Nailsea was not in the main a producer of fancy items and friggers, but its core business was producing sheet glass (window glass). I have a lot more to include in Chance Reflections whenever that is published!

I'm no expert on Nailsea, and my 'expertise' is seriously limited as all my books on the subject are currently packed away (Margaret Thomas' book on the history of the works is one such), but it would be difficult to attribute this as Nailsea without a little more proof, as M and JP point out.

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