Author Topic: Breaking News Nailsea / Bristol hat found in charity shop in Bristol for £1.50  (Read 6090 times)

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Offline oldglassman

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HI ,
            You will find without too much trouble trumpet friggers in clear and coloured glass , and they work I have several ,comically you can find them on eBay being sold as ear trumpets !!!!
 A good little series of 13 thin paperbacks by Geoffrey Wills  'English and Irish glass' has in N#13 Novelties and Friggers were you can see all the things that have been discussed , hats, pipes, bellows. trumpets, etc ,

cheers
  Peter

ps  a couple of mine added.


Offline Paul S.

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why is it that all the books you mention are volumes I don't have ;D    I have Irish content by...... Phelps Warren, G. Bernard Hughes, E. M. Elville, but unfortunately, not Wills.       But, Peter, you didn't mention a 'cello ;)        However, thanks of course for the book mention.



Offline Baked_Beans

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I've been having a go at trying to match the colour of my hat to Powell & Ricketts bottles (of Bristol)....with limited success  ::)

There is quite a good match to the top bottle which was made for a firm called Spencer Tyler from Weston Super Mare (havn't been able to find any dates for them ).

The Hodges & Son (bottom) has an even bluer tint to it !

The other, larger(left), earlier (3 piece mould patented by Ricketts) bottle has a brownish tint to the green (it is green !).

I note that Margaret Thomas states in her book (I've now got a copy, cheers) that in 1836/37 only crown window glass was being made at Nailsea.
Mike


Offline Baked_Beans

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Here's another , there is a definate blue tinge in the hat .

Perhaps after Nailsea closed many of the glassworkers went to find work in the bottle works in Bristol and continued to make friggers !
Mike


Offline Frank

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Of course they did and that is why it can be near impossible to trace a frigger to a factory.
Frank A.
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Offline flying free

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I'm confused by this thread now.
So is it possible that coloured friggers with white and blue and red for example, were made at the Nailsea factory?
thanks
m


Offline flying free

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I've been researching another piece and came across this interesting piece of information on glass makers in Bristol late 18th century and the days of the week they produced glass!
the information is taken from
 Matthews's New History of Bristol or Complete Guide
 of 1793-94 and is on the subject of Glass Manufacture in Bristol
http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/Bristol_and_Somerset/2008-11/1225886981


Offline Frank

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I'm confused by this thread now.
So is it possible that coloured friggers with white and blue and red for example, were made at the Nailsea factory?

Possible but also possibly unlikely. Remains an unknown. Unfortunately the Smith study did not know about glass trails until after the dig was finished. So I guess we will have to wait for a new dig when Tesco sell of and get demolished. The ®Ornamental burning kiln® is under the store and would be the best place to find trails of any glass used for decorative items. Most of the older assumptions have been disproved, dismissed or disbelieved.

In the meantime we can say that there are some pieces known as Nailsea glass that may or may not have a connection with Nailsea. But we do now have a new mystery of Nailsea that will also have to wait for a future dig, see Smith report.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
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Offline Frank

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... the days of the week they produced glass!

Seems a bit weird as you cannot fire up a on odd days like that, must be a misinterpretation of source material.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
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Offline flying free

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I thought it was odd and my conclusion was that it meant the days visitors could visit not that they only worked glass on those days - so  'visitors' who paid were allowed to visit on those particular days to see them working that particular type glass. 

I loved the way it was written though and found the bit about export to America really interesting - Of course I know export and import was enormous between countries at that time, no different to now really, but I mean we're talking 220yrs ago and they are discussing the huge quantities being exported.
I also loved this snippet
'by presenting a small gratuity to the workmen, who living in
 hot climates are very glad of some suction to moisten their clay.'
m

 

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