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Author Topic: Iridisation of glass - can it occur naturally?  (Read 1648 times)

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Offline David E

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Iridisation of glass - can it occur naturally?
« on: September 19, 2012, 11:38:13 AM »
I know that red wine(?) can cause iridisation to the inside of decanters and carafes, but does anyone know if this effect can occur naturally to the outside of glass? The reason I ask is because I have an item of glassware where it should not be present, but it exists very faintly. So was this deliberately done, or a natural cause?
David
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Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: Iridisation of glass - can it occur naturally?
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2012, 11:42:52 AM »
Could be the dishwasher...

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Offline David E

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Re: Iridisation of glass - can it occur naturally?
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2012, 11:51:55 AM »
Hmm, possible... but then I would have expected the gilt bands to have worn badly.
David
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Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Iridisation of glass - can it occur naturally?
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2012, 11:55:27 AM »
The dishwasher will do it; I don't know about the gliding - maybe that takes longer to come off?
Burying it for a thousand or so years in soil containing appropriate minerals would do it too. ;)
Cheers, Sue (M)

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Offline Ivo

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Re: Iridisation of glass - can it occur naturally?
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2012, 12:34:31 PM »
Metal salts in earth and sewage will do it quite fast, it does not need hundreds of years to achieve a lustre effect.

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Offline johnphilip

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Re: Iridisation of glass - can it occur naturally?
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2012, 03:22:09 PM »
OK David i offer my body and organs up for research into red wine and its effect on glass if it will help , just bury me beside a bottle,,,,  make sure its a good year and full . :D not near the sewage outlet please . :( jp

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Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Iridisation of glass - can it occur naturally?
« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2012, 03:37:47 PM »
oooh, Ivo -
"Metal salts in earth and sewage will do it quite fast, it does not need hundreds of years to achieve a lustre effect."

now you've given me ideas......... ;D
Cheers, Sue (M)

“Empirical evidence on expert opinion shows that it is extremely unreliable”
Ioannidis, (2005), Plos Medicine.

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Offline David E

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Re: Iridisation of glass - can it occur naturally?
« Reply #7 on: September 20, 2012, 09:52:33 AM »
I always thought gilding, particularly on vintage (or should I say vintique :) ) glass was highly prone to wear in a dishwasher. I would have thought it would take many, many washes to achieve this level of iridisation and then the gilt would have vanished.

So is there some air-borne chemical, perhaps a naturally occurring one, that could achieve this - I assume the presence of metallic salts that normally produces iridised glass. Perhaps it was left in a garden shed or something?

If not, then the only conclusion I can draw is that it was done deliberately as an effect.
David
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The 2nd volume of the domestic glassware of Chance Brothers
Contact ► Cortex Design ◄ to order any book

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Offline Ivo

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Re: Iridisation of glass - can it occur naturally?
« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2012, 10:19:43 AM »
I've seen the combination of very light iridescence and gilding in Polish tableware.

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Offline johnphilip

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Re: Iridisation of glass - can it occur naturally?
« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2012, 10:21:00 AM »
David i am sure the guy who makes the repros for museum shops can help with this one i believe his name is Mark Taylor he has a partner who works with him .

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