Author Topic: Pressed Glass Sugar & Creamer - ID of Pattern? Crystalware?  (Read 734 times)

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Offline David E

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This particular set is of interest to me, as it could be linked to Chance Bros.

There are various similarities: the use of Matthey Crinkles, the sparing use of gilt on the rim, single-part mould for the basin (which it seemed to prefer) and a floral transfer that has been seen on Waverley, Spiderweb, etc.

This could be the Flora pattern as produced by Chance for Crystalware Ltd, although I have nothing at all to support this idea other than the 'Flora' motif, which could be spurious.

With regard to Crystalware, I would be interested to learn anything there is to know about the company. I already have details of the company from 1946-53 and know the main contact there was a Dr. J.H. Muller, although Chance appeared to deal with him from as early as 1941, employing him as an agent.
David
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Offline David E

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Re: Pressed Glass Sugar & Creamer - ID of Pattern? Crystalware?
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2010, 02:40:20 PM »
I meant to add that apart from these two there is also supposed to be a 7-in and 10-in vase, a Biscuit Barrel and a cigarette box, possibly in this same design as they always appear linked to Flora production. However, while the 7-in and 10-in vases may have been produced, I cannot be certain about the biscuit barrel and cigarette box. It is also not certain if the green crinkle bands are part of the Flora design (assuming this is the same pattern)
David
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Offline David E

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Re: Pressed Glass Sugar & Creamer - ID of Pattern? Crystalware?
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2010, 05:01:22 PM »
Hello, I might be able to help here.

Really?

Yup, according to correspondence between Chance and Crystalware, dated 12 January 1950, one point was raised about what pattern should be employed for the base of the 10-in vase. This then goes on...

Quote
However we decide, we cannot leave the diamond pattern of the body just fading out as shown in the drawing...

So I think that answers the question, unless someone knows of another diamond pattern? Another clincher is that I also have a size for the dish: 4¾in diameter (matching the inner diameter, hence the plunger size) and a height of 21/16in (about 5.2cm), which exactly matches the dish shown here. However, this means it is not the sugar bowl as first thought.

Also, the 7-in vase is quoted as being HEXAGONAL (6-sided) and the 10-in vase as being OCTAGONAL (8-sided) so they should really stick out like a sore thumb! :thup:
David
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Offline Anne

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Re: Pressed Glass Sugar & Creamer - ID of Pattern? Crystalware?
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2010, 12:46:36 AM »
Never seen examples of either of these anywhere David, but I've seen those floral transfers used on all sorts of glassware, likewise the Crinkles, including that orange set we found of course.


Offline David E

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Re: Pressed Glass Sugar & Creamer - ID of Pattern? Crystalware?
« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2010, 09:42:36 AM »
As it was produced for Crystalware, it is understood that they may have also been exported and while production records exist showing the numbers produced, I'm not sure how long this continued for. However, it does get very murky when I discovered there was a legal entanglement between the two companies over unpaid invoices. This is why I would like to know more about the history of Crystalware and/or Dr Muller. In any event, Chance stopped its own domestic pressed glass lines after 1953, but may have continued production for third-parties.

This set could be quite rare though. I cannot trace anything, not even a hint, of the range being decorated so I wonder if these could have been tarted up to sell them off?

Finding examples of any of the other pieces would be quite a coup! As with many things that crop up on GMB, my mind is starting to play tricks and I'm 100% SURE I've seen one of the vases somewhere... Or did I?  :-\   ;D In any event, according to the production records, there were tens of thousands produced and many should have survived.

As for the transfers, I understand this type was produced by a company called J M Gulliver, so not Johnson Matthey, but could still be open-stock (available to all) - but it would be interesting if Chance did commission these transfers exclusively as I have seen one unknown dish featuring them.

I think the co-incidence of all these factors - not least the transfers/Crinkles on Spiderweb - clinch it for me.
David
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Offline David E

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Re: Pressed Glass Sugar & Creamer - ID of Pattern? Crystalware?
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2012, 10:14:36 AM »
Just bumping this topic in the event that anyone can add anything. It would help with the next book I have written (and am close to finishing) on Chance.
David
► The Curious History of the Bulb Vase ◄
 A new book by Patricia Coccoris

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