Glass Discussion & Research. No ID requests here please. > British & Irish Glass

Nailsea Glass History

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flying free:
Nice one Frank :) thanks
m

Frank:
Had Bolsterstone surfaced in 1890s would that be todayś term? And as a result Nailsea lost as just another Bolsterstone style maker? Instead Nailsea glassworks has proven enigmatic with research that might never have happened without is name coming to the fore as it has.

Bolsterstone was clearly a more important works for many reasons, hopefully it will benefit from modern archaeology one day too.

Strange turns of history.

flying free:
It's a shame about the specks of glass drops not being able to be investigated at Nailsea.  But I have to say I have bought a few pieces of glass that have literally come from the Nailsea area, none seem to tally with what the Nailsea history is so far, but I find it hard to believe that having been bought in that literal area, there isn't some connection.
I'm keeping quiet for now  :)
m

Frank:
As much as as our fantasies might wander the reality is that some will have been made at the Nailsea glassworks and others at the glassworks down the road. So a label is assumed. But what you have is a piece of glass history and unlike many of the history books you can touch it and know it is real. Somehow to me that seems so much more important than knowing exactly who it was made by and on what day. The story of the works is of course a different kettle of fish for me.

flying free:
quite.  Strangely, I was watching a program on Napoleon and the Duke of Wellington a couple of weeks ago - and whilst they were discussing the Duke of Wellington dying (1852) I was sat looking at a Clichy paperweight, unpolished with all it's pits and grazes.  I picked it up and held it remarking to OH that it actually carries the DNA of people who were making it at more or less exactly that time.  Amazing.
m

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