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Author Topic: ID help Please Amber glass champagne glass/tall sherbet Etched Daisy  (Read 305 times)

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Offline Aliacat

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Thank you in advance for any assist with this and the others I've requested help with.  This is amber/yellow glass with an etched daisy with stem and leaves on either side.  The stem is crystal, there are no markings of any kind. The glass is 4.25" tall and 4" lip to lip.


Offline Paul S.

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Re: ID help Please Amber glass champagne glass/tall sherbet Etched Daisy
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2012, 07:38:20 PM »
hello and welcome to the GMB :)                   Sorry you've been without a reply, which doubtless due to the fact that no one has recognized your glass - a not uncommon problem where decoration is commonplace and lacks recognizable quality.      Your glass is probably second half C20 in origin.         The decoration has not been created by etching (a method where the pattern is machine made through a resist and then the exposed design is bitten by acid)  -  your daisy flower has been wheel engraved.        Probably also more accurate to describe the non-coloured parts of your piece as 'clear' rather than crystal, and it can in fact make a big difference when trying to date and attribute glass such as this, if you provide a clear picture of the underside of the foot.
Table or drinking glass items such as this without a backstamp (makers name) - will remain without an attribution in a most cases, unfortunately.           Probably a mass produced piece, and although you don't mention where you acquired the glass, it may have come equally from Europe or perhaps your side of the pond.
If you like the glass keep it  -  enjoy it's looks, and drink some champers. :)         Sorry this doesn't really help.   


Offline Aliacat

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Re: ID help Please Amber glass champagne glass/tall sherbet Etched Daisy
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2012, 07:53:17 PM »
Hi,  Thank you Paul.  Actually, it did help.  You confirmed what I suspected.  They are lovely and I do like them.  I'm still hoping at some point, someone will come along and say "Oh I grew up with these and they are 'this'."  : )  What I'm really hoping for is someone to ID my amber glass 'console' bowl with the black and gold decor.  Just found out it's called a 'console'.  Until later, best regards, Deb


Offline Paul S.

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Re: ID help Please Amber glass champagne glass/tall sherbet Etched Daisy
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2012, 12:03:59 PM »
just to give an idea of the most common methods of decoration you're likely to see, here are a few pix which might be of interest.

1.............wheel engraving (same method as your piece) and showing the delicacy which can be achieved.     Appears as greyish tones, with lighter areas achieved by less contact with the copper wheel.        Outlines appears sharp and well defined.      Some depth to the cutting, but very shallow usually.

2.............machine acid etched - infinite variety of designs from geometric to naturaistic images such as this - which looks like it's supposed to be a stag with hind, a tree and bush plus some grass (can't get it all into the pic.).          Tends to look shiny but has frosted appearance, and outlines quite sharp.     After sandblasting, this has probably least cutting depth.

3.............sand blast effect - lacks quality and seen often on utility tumblers for example.          Outlines lack sharpness, and in comparison with other styles mentioned, image has zero depth.              Appears as uniform granular texture, and without ability to show tone.

4.............traditional cutting  -  should be unmistakable.     Areas of cutting should be as shiny as uncut parts of the glass, although if looked at carefully some minute traces of scratches often remain within the cutting.       Most patterns/designs created initially by use of large abrasive wheels, with varying methods (including acid) used to polish.     'V' cuts, or mitre cuts (as shown enlarged in pic 4) are very common  -  are sometimes very deep - but will always be deeper than any of the preceeding methods.


 

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