Author Topic: Nailsea?  (Read 2662 times)

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Offline david31162

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Nailsea?
« on: April 09, 2006, 11:11:39 AM »
The carboot season started properly today! Have i got my first piece of Nailsea ? If it is, its the first piece ive found in over 15 years of searching. Im i right or does the search go on?
The first person(a dealer) who got to it put it down, claiming that one end looked as though it had been broken!
David.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v210/david-dj/IMG_1058.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v210/david-dj/IMG_1059.jpg
Thank you
David


Offline paradisetrader

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Nailsea?
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2006, 11:28:24 AM »
This does not strike me as Nailsea "type" altho I do not pretend to be expert in that type of glass.
On a recent TV program a quite impressive collection of rolling pins which DID include a few of the Nailsea type were auctioned and fetched less than £10 a piece. I was surprised at the low figure.
Pete


Offline david31162

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Nailsea?
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2006, 11:32:27 AM »
Oh well, ill keep looking. It just reminded me of some id seen before somewhere. Thanks anyway, no real loss only £4 and id still have bought it Nailsea or not.
Thanks David


Offline Ivo

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Nailsea?
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2006, 12:02:49 PM »
Looks like Nailsea to me - either that or Sunderland ?
Ivo
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Offline chuggy

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Nailsea?
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2006, 05:46:26 PM »
I'd have said Nailsea and I've seen a few with the different ends.
Paul
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Offline paradisetrader

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Nailsea?
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2006, 08:02:29 PM »
I stand corrected and learning....
Until now I thought of Nailsea as the style shown on the cover of this book
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/NAILSEA-GLASS-by-KEITH-VINCENT-DJ-1st-MINT-RARE-OOP_W0QQitemZ7019935115
Pete

Offline RAY

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Nailsea?
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2006, 11:28:31 PM »
Yep nailsea, the broken end were the pontil was,  you can get them with hand painted ships on the sides , sailors used to bring them back full spices from far away places, they used to just put a cork in the open end to stop the spice from falling out
cheers Ray

Offline Bernard C

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Nailsea?
« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2006, 06:44:48 AM »
Quote from: "RAY"
... you can get them with hand painted ships on the sides, sailors used to bring them back full spices from far away places, they used to just put a cork in the open end to stop the spice from falling out ...

Ray, this is an interesting theory, and not one I have heard before.    Do you have a source for it?   I had always assumed that open-ended examples were for filling with ice, but I cannot cite an authoritative source for that opinion.   It just illustrates how easy it is to make assumptions.  They could have been both, of course, gifts filled full of spice, intended to be later used with ice.

I had always understood that these rolling pins are British or English, and date back as far as the early 19th century, being frequently and rather loosely classified as "friggers".   Large numbers were certainly made in Sunderland, as many survive decorated with the bridge, and can be dated to a certain extent by the changes to the bridge.   They were also decorated with the Tyne Bridge at Newcastle, usually with a little train on the top shelf, but no puffs of smoke, which was a later artistic device.   So it is reasonable to assume that they were also made on Tyneside.

David's example is a beauty and must be quite early.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline redheat4

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Nailsea?
« Reply #9 on: April 10, 2006, 08:03:46 PM »
http://www.broseley.org.uk/miscfiles/GlassHist.pdf

This type of glass was also produced at wrockwardine.
Ian 8)

 

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