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Author Topic: Edinburgh Glass Pattern and Type Inquiry  (Read 362 times)

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Offline Sparkling Vintage

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Edinburgh Glass Pattern and Type Inquiry
« on: November 02, 2012, 08:26:43 PM »
I am new to glass. I collected shooter glasses for a long time but not because of maker, just because of look and colors. I am getting a great appreciation for crystal. I picked these up and would like to know if they have a pattern name and also what they are called when there is no stem and what they are used for. The first one is 4" tall and 3 7/8" wide (the replacements has it listed as Edi9) . the next one is 3 1/2" x 3" wide (the replacements has it listed as Edi12). Thanks for looking


Offline Paul S.

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Re: Edinburgh Glass Pattern and Type Inquiry
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2012, 09:49:49 AM »
E. & L./Edinburgh Crystal produced a vast range of designs, which apparently occupy fourteen substantial factory pattern books - covering a period which started around the 1870's - and it's possible these are now owned by Wedgwood Waterford who bought Edinburgh Crystal, but not certain on that, perhaps someone here can comment.            The mark you show indicates a post 1955 production date after which the factory name had been changed to Edinburch Crystal, so that might at least narrow the date down.        The first piece may not have any specific use - just a small ornament, or perhaps vase, and the drinking glass I'd suggest is a bucket shaped bowl for either claret or sherry.        I'd agree that cut glass can be addictive, but unfortunately this style of unexciting cutting didn't do much for its popularity, plus much of the sharpness of design was lost due to over acid-polishing (wonderful economics for the factory, but the 'feel' was lost).    Have a look at some of the cutting patterns/designs from earlier in the C20 - and bearing in mind where you are you'll doubtless be aware of the looks of 'brilliant cut'.         Earlier cut pieces were hand finished/polished (after the initial cutting), thus leaving the pattern much sharper and giving the lead glass the light dispersing qualities it should have.
Use the search facility on the Board and you should find one or two interesting posts about Edinburgh & Leith, also Edinburgh Crystal - and there is a small book which is of interest called 'The Story of Edinburgh Crystal' by H. W. Woodward.  :)   


Offline Paul S.

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Re: Edinburgh Glass Pattern and Type Inquiry
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2012, 09:50:55 AM »
P.S.   I meant to ask, what are 'shooter glasses'   -    never heard of them :)


Offline Sparkling Vintage

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Re: Edinburgh Glass Pattern and Type Inquiry
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2012, 02:33:39 AM »
Hi Thanks for all the info. A "Shooter glass" is any glass I can drink tequila out of, or any shot of strong liquor. I even have my own personal one made from Tutuma that I hung around my neck, which I often used in my travels so as to not drink out of the bottle when it got passed around. Now that I think about it didn't matter whether I was drinking out of it or puring myself a shot.


Offline Paul S.

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Re: Edinburgh Glass Pattern and Type Inquiry
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2012, 09:16:07 AM »
thanks for the explanation :) - look forward to seeing any more cut pieces you may have...........however, would suggest that you create pix with less fussy backgrounds which make for difficulties when viewing cut designs on clear glass.         For clear glass a plain dark background is probably best, with light source from behind. :)


Offline Frank

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Frank A.
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