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Author Topic: Ident Help Please  (Read 2244 times)

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Offline flying free

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Re: Ident Help Please
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2012, 08:28:16 AM »
please excuse my apostrophe error
s/b  sons not son's  ;D
Glad this has helped with your dilemma but we still need to find the maker of the glass blank and have the enameller confirmed by someone.  I'll keep looking but I've not seen any on the net at all  :-\

Aha, having gone back and had another look without my latenight eyes on, I can see that the third vase on that page 92 has a bower that is gilded!  so another clue that the vases could have been enamelled and gilded by Muhlhaus  :)  That vase is dated c1895.  I feel very confident the maker of those blanks  is most likely the same maker as yours. 
m.


Offline MissPrints

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Re: Ident Help Please
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2012, 06:22:09 PM »
Good Morning~

Lustrous-- Thank you.

FLYING--thanks again. I, impatiently, wait for the delivery of Truitt.


This is probably not the proper thread to ask this question but I cannot resist:
I am conFUSSed(no surprise there). Assuming a pre-1895 Moser piece of colored glass. Where did the colouration come from? The sandwich process?

Example: the gilt rim of Mr. Root Beer is 1/4 inch/ apprx 6mm wide. Does the width signal the  ''sandwich'' process? If so that would explain his heft. I attached a photo of its rim--for the first time in the multiple times I have peered into the vase, I see a regular pattern of slight protuberances ''inside'' the gilt rim. 

Puzzle: the vase portion is 20''. Was the body assembled from various ''pieces''=and account for the regular pattern of protuberances/joinery? If not, then is the blank the result of one mighty big blow.


I have now reread Baldwin three times in three nights: I'm a slow learner/ need to pound information into my noggin. Like the mechanical man who wears Leiderhosen and pounds his metal hammer on the hour as part of a glockenspiel.  I am fascinated by glass.  World history has always been an interest but I never considered its effect, say, on the craft of glass.   


From what I have gleaned from Baldwin: (1) Mr. Root Beer should be Moser since it has labels and gilt numerals(for the decorator) and the design is consistent with what I believe is the time of its purchase--but the glass(if c. 1889 is correct) would have been made by another glassworks since Moser made no glass of his own until 1895+.

If only I spoke German so I could pronounce/retain the district and town names. Alas, I do not. The grandparents were multilingual but I studied math instead.


Add to that: I have 6 goblets which--now that I'm a ''72 hour old expert'' on artistry glass-- I can describe as-- they  MAY be Italian clear blanks decorated  (with the family crest) by Moser-- or not.  They are light in weight and the enamel is matte(two of Baldwin's markers) with bright gilt surrounds and motto--but those markers are not, necessarily,  definitive proof.

There is such a wealth of information on the site that my answer likely resides here which makes this post redundant but the initial excitement which has grabbed ahold of me has turned into a quest. I am convinced that whatever I thought I knew may be rubbish. On the bright side, I can learn.

Added for fun:  One 14'' Moser piece(it's in a family photo --1885-1895-- so I'm certain of its approximate date) is broken beyond anything other than a shelf piece. Turquoise, frilly edged,  with numerals 8402, gilt bees[different type from the insects of the Root Beer]and  lovely colored fruit. 

I'm in California and, last month,  sought, online, someone to restore the piece. I've taken it apart and cleaned the margins but stopped there.  I found a man who does glass restoration in Los Angeles. His name is Goldberg.  I telephoned his office and listened to his phone message. A heavy, guttural, older,  accented (as if English was not his first language) voice. I have not yet spoken with him. 

When I first read the factory name GOLDBERG (Novy Bor)  my eyes widened: would it not be wild! if the restoration man is distantly related to the Bohemian factory.


Many thanks to all for your repeated kindnesses.

MissPrints


Offline flying free

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Re: Ident Help Please
« Reply #12 on: November 16, 2012, 06:42:40 PM »
Hi MissPrints
can you please start a new thread for your other vase?  otherwise confusion reigns when trying to discuss the item in question if there is more than one piece on a thread.

I'm not sure how your blue lady vases were done, but it could be they were blown as first layer blue, then a layer of white which was then crackled before being cased in blue again.  Someone who may have more knowledge may be able to decipher it more correctly.

Does your root beer vase have applied acorns on it btw?
Also if you have the Baldwin book may I ask you to look something up for me please (I don't have the book  ::) )   - I recently bought a very large piece of glass and I just wondered whether any of the decoration or indeed the piece might be in that book?  I've sent an email to Moser to ask, but in the meantime if you have time to look I would be grateful.  Many thanks if you have time to look.
the link to my piece is here

http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,50218.msg283705.html#msg283705
m


Offline MissPrints

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Re: Ident Help Please
« Reply #13 on: November 16, 2012, 10:17:44 PM »
Afternoon, FLYING~

After a fast count, Mr. Root Beer's vase carries 64 acorns of two sizes--in one instance I noted that there was a pair of acorns.  The base carries 46 of the smaller guys. The acorn bodies are darkened: if silver then, tarnished or as originally enameled.  Note to self: Find loupe.



Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Ident Help Please
« Reply #14 on: November 17, 2012, 10:03:20 AM »
hello MissPrints - and welcome.  ;D
To tell if it's silver, rub it gently with the ball of your thumb. If it's silver, the tarnish will blacken your skin and it should start to shine a bit.
Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche


Offline MissPrints

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Re: Ident Help Please
« Reply #15 on: November 18, 2012, 01:29:11 AM »
Chopin-Liszt~ You have paired two of my favorite composers, the poets of the piano keyboard.

Thanks for the hint. I've rubbed 10 of them but the only thing that my thumb shows(now) is a dent.

Some of the acorn ''nutmeat'' portions are a gun-meal silvery grey with black--or a dark blue-- burning through from beneath.  Difficult to describe accurately: there are random ''lines'' of dark where the silver is not.

Some ''nutmeats'' are silver colored and look fine. Each acorn has a chased/hatched gilt topper.

Today it's raining in CA which makes this a holiday of sorts.  CA is a desert with golf courses. When the sun comes out tomorrow (I sound like ANNIE) I'll take some high resolution photos in natural light in an attempt to discern what's going on in those finishes. I'll post the results.

Since the piece is old it's also possible what  I'm seeing is the effect of the passage of time: smoke from fireplaces(non smoking family homeS) , atmospheric gunk buildup or ???

'Tis a mystery and that's an actual fact.

BEST!

MissPrints





Offline flying free

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Re: Ident Help Please
« Reply #16 on: November 21, 2012, 07:18:46 PM »
Missprints, could you try and upload your photos to the board please as otherwise the information is lost once the photos become unavailable to view?
Many thanks.
I found this in the meantime
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=bj6Wb6AfJxYC&pg=PA524&lpg=PA524&dq=muhlhaus+enamel&source=bl&ots=tERfn5V6r9&sig=T0k5h23p6lXR0CNUa4_lSJJrO5E&hl=en&sa=X&ei=FCitUK_nC6aZ0QXKtYG4Dg&ved=0CFoQ6AEwCDgK#v=onepage&q=muhlhaus%20enamel&f=false
m


Offline MissPrints

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Re: Ident Help Please
« Reply #17 on: November 22, 2012, 04:00:05 AM »
Good Evening, Flying Free~

Thank you! for that additional reference.  I am aware you own Bohemian Glass 1880-1940 Truitt. (Copyright  1995~no other dates). In the Truitt book the pair which is similar( that you originally referenced/pointed me to)  to those in the Antique Trader, Truitt  ''valued'' at $200-250. I like your find's prices better, she said with a giggle. When Ms. Blue is delivered to me after Thanksgiving then I'll put her in a separate thread.

The Truitt Bohemian Glass book is well worth the views~Thanks for that hint,  also.

I confess I played hooky, took the day off, and went to see Spielberg's LINCOLN.
Now it's dark but you've been so helpful that I gave the photos a go with the flash.

Four pictures:  taken with a flash and/or manipulated for contrast.

The first photo is one acorn on a small turquoise vase--(dare I say, decorated by Moser?) That   acorn is provided because it's another view of the same banding effect. Date of acquisition believed to be of the same time frame as the Root Beer. A cutie. No label. Cylindrical, 5 1/4'' in height <--for another day but useful, here.

The final three photos are similar views of Mr. Root Beer's acorns.

It's chilly tonight, the glass is cold, my hands,  warm: I didn't remove the vase from the box.

Until the weather warms up a bit, I am reluctant to take the Root Beer outside~ but I shall (crosses her heart) make a better attempt at acorn photos in shaded sunlight.

Happy Thanksgiving(if it applies)~ ~ else, enjoy your Thursday~

BEST!

MissPrints



Offline Frank

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Re: Ident Help Please
« Reply #18 on: November 22, 2012, 12:41:46 PM »
Hi,

Your piece is cased not 'sandwiched' and was made by gathering clear glass and blowing a little. This was then marvered to pick up blue enamels (coloured ground glass), then the piece would be cooled to crack the layer of blue enamel  and blown a bit more the blue splitting along the cracks as it expanded. After that another gather of clear glass and then blown to final shape in a mould.

It looks as if it could be cameo. Although the type of enameling by building up layers of enamel to simulate cameo is described in various places but I have never handled it. It needs to be looked at closely, particularly the flake at the crack to be certain it is enamel not cameo. Could you add a close up of that flaked area and also one of the shaded 'ground'. It is certainly a very finely made piece. Bigger the better, so host on your site.

It is not Mary Gregory glass, that was a marketing term for an American style of enameled glass introduced after 1900 that is copying the original Bohemian style of your vase. Mary Gregory glass is a very poor descendant of yours!

The uneven areas you mention on the other piece are an artifact of mould blowing, I presume the exterior surface is not flat. Irregular surface causes the interior surface to reflect the surface as the glass tries to spread at a regular thickness.
Frank A.
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Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Ident Help Please
« Reply #19 on: November 22, 2012, 01:08:12 PM »
I feel strongly that the lady on the crackle vase isn't "Mary Gregory" too. The quality of the modelling on your vase is vastly superior to any MG!

Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche

 

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