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Author Topic: Dates on studio glass  (Read 282 times)

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Offline brewster

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Dates on studio glass
« on: November 10, 2012, 07:26:29 AM »
I wonder about the marking of studio glass with the date.

Although other works of art and studio craft are sometimes dated, it seems to me the practice has been more common with glass than, say, pottery. Am I right? I wonder why? One possibility is that pottery is more frequently marked with a stamp, either into the wet clay or in ink on a flat surface, whereas it is little extra effort to add the date when engraving a maker's name onto glass. But even then when pots are incised by hand to show the maker they are infrequently marked with the date.

It also seems the practice of date marking of studio glass is less common now than in the 1970s and 1980s. Am I right? I was told by one artist that he stopped applying the date because people were resistant to buying work from a year or two earlier because it seemed "old". Is that a common experience?

I am intrigued by the precision in some cases. The year is most common, but occasionally the month or even the day has been marked. Michael Rayner (founder of Island Glass and Alum Bay Glass) seems to have been a practitioner, at least in early times. The example below carries only the month, but there are instances on this Board where items of his are reportedly inscribed "3RD JULY 1974" and "24th October 1977". Marking a special occasion is one possible explanation for attaching a day date, but it becomes less plausible with each occurrence (and with the absence of examples to the contrary).

Any insights?

Trevor
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Offline Frank

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Re: Dates on studio glass
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2012, 03:35:05 PM »
Amused but not surprised if people react to dates like that, I love exact dates, makes something so much more personal.
Frank A.
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Offline aa

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Re: Dates on studio glass
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2012, 07:44:15 PM »
I was told by one artist that he stopped applying the date because people were resistant to buying work from a year or two earlier because it seemed "old".

Where does it say that you have to sell work the day after you made it? :-)


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Offline aa

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Re: Dates on studio glass
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2012, 07:46:17 PM »
When mentoring, I usually point out that "old" art tends to increase in value as does old wine ;-)
Hello & Welcome to the Board! Sometimes my replies are short & succinct, other times lengthy. Apologies in advance if they are not to your satisfaction; my main concern is to be accurate for posterity & to share my limited knowledge
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Offline aa

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Re: Dates on studio glass
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2012, 09:42:33 PM »
For years I have been signing and dating my work.
Glass lasts a long time and future collectors and historians need all the help that they can get.
:-)

Also less likely for people to pass it off as something else, by adding a signature at a later date, as has been discussed in the past on this board.
Hello & Welcome to the Board! Sometimes my replies are short & succinct, other times lengthy. Apologies in advance if they are not to your satisfaction; my main concern is to be accurate for posterity & to share my limited knowledge
For information on exhibitions & events and to see images of my new work join my Facebook group
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Introduction to Glassblowing course:a great way to spend an afternoon http://www.zestgallery.com/glass.


Offline brewster

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Re: Dates on studio glass
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2012, 10:07:38 PM »
Yes, Aaron. The artist who made that comment would mostly agree with you. He said it in a spirit of commiseration and regret. He recognised that it made things harder for collectors like me who have an eye to history. On the other hand, he has to make a living in a tough marketplace.

Trevor
See my blog on Australian studio glass.
You can also inspect my Picasa page of unknown attributions. Click on a thumbnail to see a larger image and to leave comments.


Offline NMott

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Re: Dates on studio glass
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2012, 10:19:48 PM »
Maybe it's because it takes longer to make a piece of glass than a piece of pottery. Some studio potters churn out hundreds of pieces a week so it's easier to simply use a potters stamp. Some do add a date letter or mark or dots, eg, Aldermaston Pottery.

As a collector, if I saw an inscribed potter's initials and date on a piece I'd think it was by a student, for the simple reason that that's usually how students mark their work.

With glass, though, I like to see a date; the older the better.


 

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