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Author Topic: Quality heavy cut vase  (Read 1201 times)

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Offline John Smith

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Re: Quality heavy cut vase
« Reply #10 on: December 14, 2012, 08:37:15 PM »
... Hi, this is just an opinion, however it reminds me very much of the works by John Rocha for Waterford Crystal. It could also be a Preciosa piece, Czech Republic. It certainly appears to be a quality lead crystal. Would you say that it is very heavy in relation to its size? This would also indicate a factory of quality. Check also the cuts into the glass. These should be uniform whilst also displaying slight, subtle differencies if the piece has been wheel cut by hand.   

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: Quality heavy cut vase
« Reply #11 on: December 14, 2012, 10:04:54 PM »
showing my ignorance here John, I think..........I had assumed that all such decoration would have been wheel cut by hand..........however, do I take it that you are suggesting there is a machanized alternative - thus producing decoration that is too symmetrical and perfect?  :)

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Offline John Smith

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Re: Quality heavy cut vase
« Reply #12 on: December 14, 2012, 10:28:56 PM »
... Not at all Paul. The ignorance would be my part, but "faux" wheel cut lead crystal will be moulded and much of it exists. Even items of so-called quality. The lead content of the crystal itself is the best way to determine... Me thinks.

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Offline John Smith

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Re: Quality heavy cut vase
« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2012, 10:50:07 PM »
It is my understanding that lead crystal uses lead oxide as a replacement of the calcium content to the more common and lesser quality potash glass. It is these very modifications which lends itself to the weightiness and the allowance for this glass type to be cut with numerous & desirable decorative features. It has brilliance and will not display a waxy feel or appearance, and its decorative ‘cuts’ will be very obvious and apparent, and at times even sharp-edged to the touch. Vintage cut glass has much left to be researched. Pieces (generally) are seldom signed or maker marked, less it interferes with the overall pattern. Many factories have used decorative elements incorporated within the designs which can often determine the maker. Stars, upon bases for example or criss-crossed patterns within circles or ovals can quite often be the ‘hallmarks’ of a particular factory… This is my understanding. It is not sacrosanct, but please take from it my own observations.  ::)

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: Quality heavy cut vase
« Reply #14 on: December 15, 2012, 05:34:00 PM »
thanks John, and agree with your comments re lead glass versus potash, also that the cutting from some factories is recognizable by some element of style that is seen in various designs.         I think Wolfie has already told us this piece has cut decoration, so no moulding here - I
I still think this has originated from somewhere like Czechoslvakia (one of your suggestions also) or Germany. 

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