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Author Topic: Etruscan design 1850 ish plate with handpainted enamel -angel orange black white  (Read 3455 times)

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Offline flying free

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I've started a new thread for this plate because it is very different to my Harrach Etruscan vase on another thread.

It's hand enamelled rather than transfer printed, burnt orange but not the same as the Harrach vase orange.  9.5" wide

It has most in common (but not a lot) with an unidentified vase on page 136 of Charles Hajdamach's British Glass 1800-1914, the one second from right on the group.

It could be Bohemian or English I guess.
However, whereas I can see on that group photo that, to my eye, vases second from left and furthest right might be Harrach/Bohemian (especially when comparing to my Harrach vase), I'm not getting any feeling from my plate that it is specifically Bohemian.

The hand painted decoration rather than transfer printed, and the 'loop, dot, teardrop' device, and the different colours and detail in the up and down square shape (what is that called?) decoration round the rim, and the thickness of the gold, makes me think English but the blank makes me think possibly Bohemian.
I can't find any similarities with the Webb's Etruscan handpainted series by Mr Giller in the book on page 138.

 The blank is white opaline, translucent but early old white glass - it doesn't have the look of Richardson's Vitrified glass or French opaline for example, it does have some similarity with my Harrach vase but it's not as thick or consistent somehow. Underneath the gilding I think the rim is cut bevelled and polished rather than firepolished but it is very hard to tell.
 The foot has no pontil mark, it is a shallow foot and is completely matt on the base whereas the plate front and back is polished shiny.  That might be from wear but I think it was ground flat and polished smooth matt.  My Harrach vase foot is similar but not so neatly done.

So, possibly an unidentified 'Etruscan' range so far?
Any thoughts much appreciated.
m

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adding a very close up cropped shot of the enamelling.
It makes it look messy but it isn't, it's hard to view enamel decoration close up really as it always looks terrible in my view.
You can see where there used to be gilding on the square up and down border.
m

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bump and adding some more close ups of the decoration
m

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Huge excitement here lol -
I'd been wondering if my plate might be Russian - no idea why,  just because - maybe  because the gilding is very thick on it and there is lots of it, some worn now but in it's original state there would have been a lot of gold, and because the entire thing is handpainted
 
and I think it might be  ;D
Imperial Glass Factory St. Petersburg, after a design by Alexander Briullov, circa 1840

http://www.auctions-fischer.de/catalogues/online-catalogues/194-russian-art-faberge-icons.html?L=1&kategorie=2&artikel=1963&L=1&cHash=372f9e9d17

and here's a flask and beaker - the orange is identical - also from the Pompeiian range Imperial Glass Factory
http://www.artfact.com/auction-lot/nachtflasche-mit-stopsel-und-becher-milk-glass-de-132-c-ed1553e63f

My first piece of Russian glass - so exciting  ;D

This vase is obviously a different range but still has the orange and part of the design in the border but also has the 'flying' people.
http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/5978881

m

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Offline Lustrousstone

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Certainly looks likely

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Offline Ivo

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There is nothing quite like it in the "Russian Glass" book but the probability is quite high.

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Thanks both :)
Ivo thank you for looking in the book, I appreciate it.

  Doing a bad google translate on the nightflask and beaker pieces, it says there are almost identical pieces in the 2004 exhibition catalogue to this flask and beaker (my underlining below).  I'm pretty confident my plate is from the same maker and time period:

'Lot 132: Nachtflasche mit Stöpsel und Becher Milk Glass Decanter with Stopper and Beaker Imperial Glass Manufactory, St. Petersburg
Description: Kaiserliche Glasfabrik St. Petersburg, wohl Alexander Briullow (Entwurf), um 1840'

'Milk glass. On the wall in colorful painting executed? Harder decorative frieze figures on ancient models. Stand and neck orange accents. Gold Rings min. rubbed. H. 8/15, 5 cm (04,823,017)

Briullow Alexander was one of the most influential interior designers of Russia, which took up the new vital flow of historicism and spread. Influenced by his visit to the excavations at Pompeii, he designed the dining room in the Winter Palace in the Pompeian style. The Imperial Glass Manufactory St. Petersburg Conducted the glass vases made me f? For this space by its design. from Almost identical pieces are displayed in the exhibition catalog Imperial Glass Factory 1777-1917, St. Petersburg, 2004, p 71, No 38'



What is interesting to me is:

1)  the era of the piece - 1840, early opaline, almost milchglas - it's very exciting to have a piece of Russian opaline glass
2) The fact that the design is put down to the influence of the decoration of the Small Dining Room (Pompeian room) in the Winter Palace by Alexander Briullow (from what I read another designer was in place after him from 1840-1860).  And from what I read, the Pompeian design he did for the room seems to have followed, and was obviously influenced by, his previous visit to Pompei.

So if the dating is correct and my plate is Russian from 1840, this makes it earlier I believe, than for example
-  the Richardson pieces showing classical designs shown on the Portland vase in burnt orange and white (c.1845-1850 - CH British Glass 1800-1914  page 101) and plate 84 page 113 Sepia enamelled white opaline vase after an engraving by Flaxman
- The Webb's Mr Giller decorated vases in classical Etruscan theme shown in the Art Union Journal 1847
- The Davis Greathead and Green vases (page 137 same book) shown at the Great Exhibition in 1851

It also makes it possibly earlier than all the vases shown on page 136 where the caption says 'Five vases in the Etruscan style, fashionable from 1847-1851....'  if the dating is correct. 

In ‘The History of Glass’ Klein,Lloyd on page 176 it says that Russia held it’s ‘first public exhibition of Russian Manufactures, in St Petersburg in 1828-29, …’
It goes on to say Russia held other public exhibitions during the first half of the 19th century -

 ‘Countries such as America, Russia and France had frequently organised exhibitions of their own manufacturers during the first half of the century, but the Great Exhibition (this was held in 1851), or the Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations as it was officially called, was the first to bring together products from all over the world.  Most of Europe’s leading glass manufacturers were represented as well as several from America…. (the one exception was France, whose only representative was Clichy)’. 
 
It doesn’t mention Russia being represented at the Great Exhibition and neither does it mention Russia in CH British Glass 1800-1914.
But I wonder if the influence of all these Etruscan style vases being shown by various British and Bohemian makers came from Russia perhaps?  Especially the use of the wide bands of burnt orange colour on the Harrach pieces?

m

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adding to my post just above
I did find the floor plan for the 1851 exhibition and Russia was on there.

Ivo, when they say there is something in the 2004 Exhibition catalogue, is that the Russian Glass book you are looking at as well, the book that was produced for that exhibition?   If so, how do you think it compares?  They say page 71 no 38 is similar to the flask and beaker.

I think I have found something  interesting here:
This link is to a document discussing the issues preserving/restoring artifacts in the State Historical Museum Moscow. 
the source is 'Ancient Vases in the State Historical Museum:History of the Collectionand Some Problems of Restoration' by
Denis Zhuravlev and Georgiy Lomtadze

On page 98 bottom right is a plate or as it is described 'attic red-figure cup' that has a type of greek key design around the outside edge border and two figures in the middle of it, one of the figures is winged and is referred to as Eros.  It really does look as though my plate has been significantly influenced by this one?
http://www.academia.edu/2176446/Ancient_Vases_in_the_State_Historical_Museum_History_of_the_Collection_and_Some_Problems_of_Restoration
However, it seems the artifacts were acquired in the 19th and 20th century.

So far I feel very confident my plate is Russian - especially also given my previous comments earlier in the thread where I was struggling to decide whether it might be English or Bohemian, but couldn't pin it to either of those because there was always that 'something' that wasn't quite 'right'.

But I wonder where that plate/cup in the link originated or at least, was viewed to influence the design of my plate?  perhaps there were more of them? Perhaps this was a common design and hence the influence for my plate?
m

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I don't want to link it here but I've found an opaline vase in 'Etruscan style', their words, in the digital glass collection in the Hermitage Museum that has exactly the same handpainted border as my plate and also the use of the burnt orange ground on white opaline glass - I assume their identification is accurate and therefore using this as identification, I am wholly confident my plate is Russian and dates to the 1840's !  yaaay  ;D  - Source: The Hermitage Museum dot org online collection using search 'glass', the vase is number 336 in the collection.
m

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http://www.hermitagemuseum.org/fcgi-bin/db2www/fullSize.mac/fullSize?selLang=English&dlViewId=RDE3W5O4ZJWQ76BZ&size=big&selCateg=glassware&dlCategId=BI3%2B40TJ3$DQGARP9R&comeFrom=quick

This is a quicker link to the vase that has the same border decoration as my plate as well as the orange background enamel :)
m

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