No-one likes general adverts, and ours hadn't been updated for ages, so we're having a clear-out and a change round to make the new ones useful to you. These new adverts bring in a small amount to help pay for the board and keep it free for you to use, so please do use them whenever you can, Let our links help you find great books on glass or a new piece for your collection. Thank you for supporting the Board.

Author Topic: Refixing loose epergne flutes  (Read 340 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Bernard C

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 3200
  • Milton Keynes based British glass dealer
Refixing loose epergne flutes
« on: April 30, 2013, 07:05:51 AM »
I recently bought a Walsh mother of pearl naturalistic epergne.   A flute is loose, and should be cemented back into its brass cup with plaster of paris, I believe.   Unfortunately what is left of the old plaster of paris has been contaminated with something, probably by the previous owner trying everything to remove it, so I need to clean most or all of the old plaster of paris away first to do a proper and long-lasting job.

I've been told that soaking in warm fairly concentrated baking powder (sodium bicarbonate) solution for a couple of days should soften or dissolve it.

Have you any experience of this?   What would you suggest?   Could the baking powder or any other suggested softener affect either the brass or the iridescence on the glass?   Of course abrasives are very much a last resort.

Thanks for your interest,

Bernard C.  8)
Happy New Year to All Glass Makers, Historians, Dealers, and Collectors

Text and Images Copyright 200415 Bernard Cavalot

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


bfg

  • Guest
Re: Refixing loose epergne flutes
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2013, 10:34:49 AM »
Hi Bernard

Sodium bicarb is used as an old fashioned cleaner for brass, it will remove any tarnish - is that the effect you wanted? wouldnt leave it soaking for a few days, a few hours to soften the p of p perhaps and then physically remove it with an implement of some sort would be my suggestion (after perhaps testing the reaction on the brass in some small inconspicuous area first)

If you do it, can you come back with some results please? I have a similar issue with  an Aspreys object needing remounting so would love to know

Mel

Support the Glass Message Board by finding glass through glass-seek.com


Offline glassobsessed

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 5147
  • Gender: Male
    • Mdina
    • South Wales
Re: Refixing loose epergne flutes
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2013, 02:07:26 PM »
I think Mel's idea of just soaking in water should soften it up enough to dismantle, any excess plaster should then be easy enough to remove.

John

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


Offline Paul S.

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 8021
  • Gender: Male
Re: Refixing loose epergne flutes
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2013, 06:35:39 PM »
think Mel is right with the baking soda  -  and the brass can be masked off to prevent contact with the liquid - and hopefully the flute will then loosen enough to be removed, after which any remaining p of p can be removed physically.            Most people have Polyfilla in the home, but p of p is probably not much used these days, so it would mean going out and buying it specially.           Am I right in thinking that p of p generates heat as it cures and hardens?  -  I seem to remember something like that, but could be wrong.         I'm sure that factory workers would have used Polyfilla had it been around 100 years ago.
Assume some tender wiggling of the flute won't make it part from the brass holder Bernard, which might save using the bicarb.

Support the Glass Message Board by finding glass through glass-seek.com


Offline Bernard C

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 3200
  • Milton Keynes based British glass dealer
Re: Refixing loose epergne flutes
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2013, 08:23:45 AM »
Mel & John Thanks.   I will let you know.

Paul No, not Polyfilla.   As Walsh used plaster of paris in 1901, then that's what I will be using in 2013, and saying so when I sell the epergne.   It should be easy enough to obtain from craft shops.   A lovely bonus is that it will give me an excuse to obtain a few moulds and a tin of paints and have a model making and painting session with our little grandchildren to use up the surplus.   I might keep it in reserve as a wet weather activity for when we take them camping in the summer.

Anyone have any suitable unwanted moulds?

Bernard C.  8)

... and this was my three thousandth post!    ... and just a few days before I hit official retirement age!   What a load of rubbish I must have spouted over the years.   Apologies to you all.    ;D
Happy New Year to All Glass Makers, Historians, Dealers, and Collectors

Text and Images Copyright 200415 Bernard Cavalot

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


Offline Paul S.

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 8021
  • Gender: Male
Re: Refixing loose epergne flutes
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2013, 07:16:22 PM »
don't know if we're prepared to accept your apologies Bernard ;D ;)

Sure, p of p is the real thing, and doubtless easy to obtain still  -  I did the same with it using those moulds when mine were young, and we made Disney characters, but I regret that the moulds have long since gone.         I personally wouldn't have a problem using the modern equivalent  -   it isn't a question of  ...oh well, no one is going to know, so I'll shove anything in ......... it's more a case of I have Polyfilla in the house already, and it's a more than adequate substitute, and unlike p of p doesn't 'go hard' suddenly  -  I'm sure William Morris would have gladly jumped at the chance of using a router or cordless drill had they been available in the 1880's.

Don't tell your buyers that you've been tinkering too much with these flutes, they might wonder what else is amiss ;D   -    best of luck with the mould making. :) 

Support the Glass Message Board by finding glass through glass-seek.com


 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk

Look for glass on ebay.co.uk Look for glass on eBay.com (US)
Link to Glass Encyclopedia
Link to Glass Museum


This Website is provided by Angela Bowey, PO Box 113, Paihia 0247, New Zealand