Author Topic: possible Webb's Gay Glass 'Evergreen'.  (Read 454 times)

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: possible Webb's Gay Glass 'Evergreen'.
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2013, 07:33:58 PM »
but of course - perhaps he should have included some pix of these varieties in the flesh. ;)       My copy is presently dismantled completely - am finally getting around to re-binding and making two volumes - so I can read it in the bath.        It's the biggest single volume of all that I have, and it's tedious keep humping the lump on and off the shelf.

As regards these three varieties of Gay Glass (bet they wouldn't call it that now) - the 'Sunshine' amber seems not uncommon, with 'Spring' probably beating 'Evergreen' into second place  -  but that's just my experience - and I bet the Nile doesn't look remotely as green as this 'Spring' ;D          Outside of Gay Glass, the bog standard amber - mostly in Bull's Eye pattern  -  has possibly been the most frequent of colours.
I've yet to find a piece of 'Cut Water Lily' - so am thinking this is uncommon - but more or less so than Webb's 'blue' I don't know.


Offline Paul S.

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Re: possible Webb's Gay Glass 'Evergreen'.
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2013, 02:08:35 PM »
In the first pic are Gay Glass examples of what I'm fairly certain are 'Sunshine' Amber and 'Spring' Green (the two larger pieces) - they both glow quite strongly with the u.v. torch.                          The smaller cocktail glass - a tad over 3" (80mm) tall) has a yellowish lime colour, and doesn't appear in Hajdamach as one of the Gay Glass colours - also it doesn't react under the torch.              All three pieces have the same c. 1935 - 49 backstamp.

I've not previously been aware of seeing this particular shade of yellowish lime as coming from Webb, and don't think I've seen it in the books.

Would anyone care to comment, and thanks for looking.


 

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