Author Topic: Seguso?  (Read 985 times)

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Offline busterj

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Seguso?
« on: June 16, 2013, 01:36:52 PM »
Greeting's Everyone,

I've had this bowl for just over 20 years and was told it was by Seguso. I had no reason to question this attribution, it looks like his work.

Over the years I have yet to see another piece like it. The closest I could come up with was his series of Macchia, http://tinyurl.com/mkrxyk6 .

I'm hoping that someone here may have some info about this piece. Particularly the technique.

Thanks in advance,

rob


Offline TxSilver

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Re: Seguso?
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2013, 12:49:49 AM »
Good evening, Rob. I've been doing a bit of searching to locate your bowl. It looks most to me like the work of Archimede Seguso or Anzolo Fuga, but I couldn't verify either... yet. I wasn't sure what you wanted to know about the technique. It looks like large murrines to me in uranium glass. I can tell it is a very good quality bowl. Super nice. There is something about the bowl that reminds me of Fuga's "Windows" pieces.
Anita
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Offline TxSilver

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Re: Seguso?
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2013, 12:58:56 AM »
Please ignore -- changed my mind.  ;)
Anita
San Marcos Art Glass
Visit the Murano Zoo
http://sites.google.com/site/muranozoo/


Offline busterj

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Re: Seguso?
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2013, 11:27:12 AM »
Thanks so much Anita for taking taking the time to research and respond about this bowl.

Concerning the technique, I thought maybe there was a specific term used to describe it simular to the Macchia line of glass, large murrines works though.

Hopefully others will have more info on it.

Thanks again,

rob


Offline rocco

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Re: Seguso?
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2013, 06:28:30 PM »
Hi rob,
first -- it is a beautiful bowl, looks to me like it came from a top maker. (Archimede Seguso was my first thought, too.)

I looked through my books, but no match.
Closest I could find is a vase in Judith Miller's "Glas des 20. Jahrhunderts" (= 20th century glass); it has silver instead of gold, and blue "dots" instead of triangles (with dark-puple outline like in yours). Unfortunately no attribution given, just "free shaped vase Murano glass, mid to end of 20th century", and a prize guide of 300-400 Euro.
The vase has a shape similar to some " Macchie Ambra Verde" pieces btw...

Sorry, so not much help from my side.

Michael


Offline ardy

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Re: Seguso?
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2013, 09:35:49 PM »
Yes it could well be A.S. but I looked through all my books and nothing remotely like this technique. The light pulveri is used by him a lot but not unique. Could have been SvdA as well.  Possibly an A.S. line that was not popular at the time. Very interesting.
Clean and Crisp a Murano twist.
Archimede tops my list.


Offline busterj

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Re: Seguso?
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2013, 11:00:00 AM »
Thanks Michael for your input.

It's a piece that I actually don't have out on display but one day while looking at my photo's it occurred to me I haven't seen anything remotely like it before. Which is odd considering the amount of glass I've looked at on line and in books. Hopefully at some point a simular piece will show up.

Ardy,

When you mentioned the light pulveri, is it the gold leaf you're referring too? I unfortunately don't have a photo that shows the gold all that well. I'm wondering though is this also considered pulveri. Thanks for your time.

rob


Offline ardy

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Re: Seguso?
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2013, 10:07:12 PM »
Hi Buster yes it is the gold but more how it is applied. Pulveri (powder)is the name and Sfumato (nuanced) the technique. It is the fine smoky like trails that A.S. used so often in his pieces. I have a wonderful bowl that utilises this technique very well. Will attach picture. Still I am sure you know this.

Having looked at your reference and done some more digging around it seems highly likely this is Archimede Seguso but without any further reference it is hard to say for sure. I have a couple of pieces with his label on them and never seen them anywhere. Still he was manufacturing for a very long time and would have done many lines that did not make a long run. Mostly what we see are his bread and butter lines. To find something serious is not easy there are many collectors still prepared to pay thousands for a merletto vase of some size.

It is an interesting piece and I would not be selling it.

regards
Clean and Crisp a Murano twist.
Archimede tops my list.


Offline busterj

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Re: Seguso?
« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2013, 08:03:16 PM »
Thanks again Ardy.

Theres so many layers to the techniques that were/ are used by Murano glass blowers. I tend stay comfortably inside the box in regards to how pieces are made, if it walks like a duck, it's a duck. But clearly this duck is in disguise! So you figure that sfumato was also a technique used on my bowl?

The bowel you posted is beautiful and looks to be very large.

rob


Offline langhaugh

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Re: Seguso?
« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2013, 09:36:56 PM »
I've been looking at this piece fora couple of days now, unable to make my mind up about it. It's very similar to a B & T piece I have, except in the B & T piece the blue spot/white spots look like  machia, thick globs of glass dropped on the surface of the gather. And I tend to agree that the blue in your piece look more look primitive murrines.  The gold is from thin sheets of gold foil applied to the gather, rather than powder sprinkled on.  I'm not sure of the sfumato either. It's originally a painting term meaning a very gradual, barely discernible shift from one shade or colour to another, and I don't see that here, although it's pretty clear in Ardy's piece.

I think I'd lean more to B & T for this one. The company did use large primitive murrines including some triangular ones they called tessere. And B & T loved their gold foil.

Whatever techniques were used and whoever made the it, it's a vey nice piece.

David





 
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