Author Topic: Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?  (Read 4317 times)

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Offline Bernard C

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« on: May 07, 2006, 03:36:20 PM »
Is this lovely little tazza S&W "Moresque"? See Hajdamach pp276–7, who dates its launch to 1889.   Although it looks ruby and gold, the threading is in green, something between an apple green and an emerald green.

Click on picture gallery.

Average file sizes: thumbnails 1.6Kb, standard images 14Kb, SuperSize images 44Kb.   Software: IrfanView (free download).

Anyway, questions.   Any other names for this style?    Did they make other shapes?   Was Oscar Pierre Erard involved in this design?   How long was it in production?   I've never seen anything like it before, only the rather less delicate uncoloured styles which Manley attributed to Richardson.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline KevinH

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2006, 04:42:02 PM »
It's a pity that there wa no illustrated example of "Moresque" in the Hajdamach book. But from the very brief book description and your excellent images, Bernard, I'd agree that "Moresque" could fit as being finely trailed over a moulded pattern. I don't recall seeing an example anywhere.

It might be wise to show the Tazza to Roger Dodsworth.
KevinH


Offline Bernard C

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2006, 05:32:04 PM »
Quote from: "KevH"
... I don't recall seeing an example anywhere.   It might be wise to show the Tazza to Roger Dodsworth. ...

Kevin — Thanks for your considered reply.  As it happens, I did show it to Roger at Broadfield House, about ten days ago.   It was he who suggested that it was threaded in green, not amber, as I had previously supposed.   It was only today, catching it in the sunlight at a particular angle, that I could clearly see the green.   There is little or no response to my UV tester.

Quote from: "KevH"
... It's a pity that there was no illustrated example of "Moresque" in the Hajdamach book. ...

I got the strong impression that Roger hadn't seen one before, or at least not one quite like it.   He certainly spent a long time examining it.   If Broadfield House does not have one in its collection, that would explain the lack of a photograph in Hajdamach.    

Thanks for your sensible comments about image dimensions, file sizes and bandwidth.   Unfortunately the few of us who take these matters seriously are a tiny minority.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Frank

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2006, 05:48:14 PM »
Magnificent find! Refreshing to see something so well made!
Frank A.
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Offline KevinH

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2006, 06:18:43 PM »
Aha! I lied :oops: I had seen something (broadly) similar before - in one of my cupboards :!:

A pair of small salts, 2 3/4 inch diameter & 1 3/4 inch high. Clear feet. The image link below shows that there is what looks like a very intricate pattern within the glass as well as being machine trailed on the outer surface. Actually, the inner pattern is simple diamonds and is hardly noticebale to the touch - some of the patterning in the image appears to be a result of an optical illusion.

http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-1792

Ok, these are nowhere as nice as Bernard's tazza, and the trailing is definitely just regular pink, but perhaps they are of the same general manufacturing process - and possibly also S&W? Or they may have been made by another of the companies producing trailed wares, of which Thomas Webb was certainy one.

My salts came from the Cyril Manley collection, through the sale of his massive Salt colletion, a few years after the main glass was sold. No attribution was given.
KevinH


Offline Glasscollector.net

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2006, 06:52:57 PM »
Hi Bernard,

Very nice Tazza (please let me know if it's for sale  :D

I have a very small collection of this type of glass, and have always been under the impression it was made by S&W, but have yet to see any positive attributions from a reference source.    Some of the shapes (box pleated rims for example) are tell tale signs of S&W,  but again I've not seen anything specifically referenced :(

Brian
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Offline Bernard C

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2006, 07:48:16 PM »
Kevin — There's a lot of skill in this type of work, a whole step up from basic match-striker machine threading.   For instance the requirement is not just to accurately thread, but to distort the thread to a precise more semi-circular cross section on the high points of the mould-blown pattern.   So I don't think many glassworks would have been involved in its production.

Quote from: "Glasscollector.net"
... Very nice Tazza (please let me know if it's for sale) ...

Brian — It will be for sale when I have found out as much as possible about it.    I don't collect glass, other than damaged reference pieces.   I'll let you know.

What do you mean by "box pleated rims"?   With an edge profile like battlements on the top of a castle or city wall?

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Glasscollector.net

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2006, 08:18:12 PM »
Hi Bernard,


Quote from: "Bernard C"
.

What do you mean by "box pleated rims"?   With an edge profile like battlements on the top of a castle or city wall?



Yes I think you've got it (although I never quite compared it to a castle wall :-) , here's an example I pilfered from the Great Glass site:



Brian
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Offline Frank

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2006, 09:41:49 PM »
Brian,

We do not allow pilfering from other web sites or any other copyright abuse. You can provide a link to the page and the number of the piece for people to checkout.

Image removed.

Thanks
Frank A.
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Offline Leni

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2006, 10:48:21 PM »
Er .... would you say this was an example of 'box-pleated rims'?  http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-1588  
And if so, is this likely to be by S&W  :shock:
Leni

 

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