Author Topic: Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?  (Read 4779 times)

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Offline Glasscollector.net

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #20 on: May 19, 2006, 02:31:21 PM »
Le Casson that may well be true, but I've seen books published about a lot more obscure glass makers then Stevens & Williams.  This would be an easy one, just copy the catalogs.  There's been several catalog reprints of CF Monroe (probably not well known in France and the U.K.) and they sell for a paltry $20 (pocket change in the EU and U.K.).  

Maybe someone just needs to explore the possibilitiy.

Brian
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Sklounion

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #21 on: May 19, 2006, 03:34:06 PM »
I take your point on-board, but catalogues, and pattern-books, are very different things. Catalogues are produced as a marketing aid, and tend not to have serious copyright issues attached. Company pattern books are arguably not produced to aid marketing, and copyright issues can be very complex.
I know of at least one UK manufacturer (which no longer exists), whose pattern books, now belong to another company, which would never consider allowing anyone to publish the pattern books, in any manner, which would undermine that company's image. Knowing the holding company, any publication of the pattern books would have to be on high quality gloss/art paper. A pain for the knowledge base, but that company spends prolific amounts of money protecting both its image, and brands.

Regards,

Le Casson


Offline Dilwyn Hier

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #22 on: May 19, 2006, 06:02:08 PM »
Brian,

It is our Glass Fair this weekend (http://www.glassfairs.co.uk) and I will need more time to respond fully so just briefly:

Some of the named glass I have located in the pattern books, others are unclear e.g. Sea Shell could apply to what you have referred to as Jewelled Ware because it resembles a sea urchin; Jewel Ware could be something different.

Your proposed online article resembles a lecture I do that covers the technical skills of John Northwood and is illustrated with designs from the pattern books. It also shows that Tapestry is not Flint threaded ware enamelled by Erard; I would be interested to know what your version is. I would also like to see your “threaded mother-of-pearl air trap zipper piece” because this is also clearly shown in the pattern books and I know what this looks like.

Description books 21 to 24 cover the years 1897 to 1901 and do not show any of the above glass. They major on the work of Orchard and Hodgetts namely polished intaglio/transparent cameo work on multi-cased (coloured) blanks. Books 10 to 15 cover the glass we jointly appear to be interested in.

Yes my book on Burmese is long over due but I keep promising myself to finish it this year. I would be very interested in seeing the examples you mention and any special/unusual pieces you might have in particular any with a moulded surface design such as Webbs version of Moresque. How’s that for bringing us back to the subject.

Have a good weekend

Dil


Offline Glen

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #23 on: May 20, 2006, 12:58:07 PM »
Out of interest, other readers may find it as fascinating as I do, that Harry Northwood creatively translated the concept of threading into some items of his press-moulded iridised ware (I hesitate to use the words "Carnival Glass" within this topic thread  :lol: )

On his "Butterfly" handled bon bon, the exterior pattern was an ingenious threaded "look-alike" (strictly not seen on all of the "Butterfly" bonbons, as some have a plain exterior). The "Threaded" exterior examples are very sought after.

Harry Northwood also produced a variation of his "Tornado" vase with a "Ribbed" exterior that is reminiscent of threading. I've put some photos here that show it (and also a plain "Tornado" vase).
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/thumbnails.php?album=30

Harry would appear to have taken his father's 1885 patented threading machine one step further.

Glen
Just releasedCarnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-booksthree volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline Glasscollector.net

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #24 on: May 25, 2006, 05:16:29 AM »
Hi Dil,

I hope you did well at the Glass Fair.  I will get pictures this weekend and send you a link with some examples of what I'm planning to include in my write-up as well as the couple pieces of Webb Burmese that may be of interest.  I'd be very interested to learn more about your Northwood lecture.

I'm working on ordering the microfilm of the Stevens & Williams design books 10-15 as you've suggested.  I wish I could make digital copies of the microfilm, but apparently I'll have to settle for photocopies.

Thanks,
Brian
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Offline Glasscollector.net

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #25 on: May 26, 2006, 11:59:57 PM »
Here's a beautiful berry bowl set (including the master berry bowl!) at auction:

http://cgi.liveauctions.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=6628685052

Interestingly they attribute it to Stevens & Williams.

Brian
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Offline Dil

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #26 on: May 29, 2006, 11:52:20 AM »
Quote from: "Glen"
Out of interest, other readers may find it as fascinating as I do, that Harry Northwood creatively translated the concept of threading into some items of his press-moulded iridised ware....

On a technical basis what you are showing in this photograph is a twisted rib and not threading. Threading is a continuous, fine trail of glass applied to the body of an article; it resembles the thread of a screw.

Quote from: "Glen"
Harry would appear to have taken his father's 1885 patented threading machine one step further.

The threading machine was patented in 1876 by William James Hodgetts of the firm Hodgetts Richardson and Son. John Northwood took out a patent in 1885 for a machine to manipulate threading; better known as the "pull-up thread" machine. The effect produced by Harry has no resemblence what so ever to that obtained using this machine.


Offline Dil

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #27 on: May 29, 2006, 12:33:50 PM »
Hi Folks,

Just to come back to the issue of placing on-line the S&W pattern books. Let me give you some data that puts the problem/costs into propective.

There are 67 Books. Book 1 starts in 1851 and Book 59 ends in 1945. In these 59 books the pattern numbers start at 21(!!!) and finish with 69500.
There are an average of five designs to a page making 13,900 double letter size pages. (The designs appear on the lefthand page, the costings and details of artists/workers on the right.) Over the years I have managed to capture 1847 of these pages to date. Each digital picture has to be processed and converted to pdf so that the books can be reproduced for ease of viewing. - It takes up a lot of time.

When you then consider that the pattern books of all the other Stourbridge factories exist, but in much larger formats not conducive to easy photography, you begin to realise that without national interest and funding the task is unthinkable.


Offline Glen

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #28 on: May 29, 2006, 12:56:35 PM »
Dil - thank you for your comments. I am aware of the history of the threading machine(s) - I have Hajdamach's tome to hand.

I stand by my observation. My feeling is that Harry Northwood "creatively translated" (my specific choice of words was deliberate) the concept of applied threading on to several of his Carnival Glass items. The Butterfly bonbon exterior is a good example - the Tornado vase is an "offshoot".

We shall have to agree to disagree, I think.

Glen
Just releasedCarnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-booksthree volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline Glasscollector.net

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Stevens & Williams 1889 Moresque?
« Reply #29 on: June 22, 2006, 07:36:29 AM »
I found something very interesting.  I was thumbing through the April 2004 Early's Auction catalog, and spied a compote in the kind of glass that Bernard initially posted (page 32, lot 341).

When I read the description I was surprised that it read:

"Signed Webb compote, cranberry foot and bowl with controled amber threading separated with a crystal rigaree stem, signed - Webb Patent, 6" tall."

Looks like they may well be Thomas Webb & Sons.

Brian
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