Author Topic: Royal Brierley  (Read 5930 times)

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Offline nigel benson

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Re: Royal Brierley
« Reply #20 on: January 27, 2007, 05:51:34 PM »
Hello again,

I have some fresh information regarding the Studio at Royal Brierley and the items marked "Royal Brierley Studio".

According to Jeanette Hayhurst, when discussing this topic with her earlier this afternoon, the two things are not synonimous with each other.

Catherine Hough is believed (from memory) to have had a hand in setting up the Studio in which glass was made, but it was other makers that worked there and not Catherine. Jane Beebe was mentioned at this point as having worked there - amongst others.

The range of wares that have an irridised finish over red or blue and that have been referred to from time-to-time as Loetz-alike were made seperately by the company, Royal Brierley, in an effort to modernise production and as an answer to the work of Studio factories such as Isle of Wight. She also recalled that they commissioned Michael Harris to design these pieces :o. (See also Sue's comment about Timothy Harris above).

Jeanette and Charles Hajdamach saw this "Studio" range introduced at the Birmingham Trade Fair in the mid 1980's (1986 was mentioned first, followed by a thought about why it could well have been 1985 on a journey up to Stourbridge to view the Cyril Manley Sale).

Bearing in mind that this is a series of memories, albeit from a reliable source, I feel that this information should be regarded as a starting point to be proved rather than taken as fact at this point in time.

Nigel


Offline Pip

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Re: Royal Brierley
« Reply #21 on: January 27, 2007, 05:59:39 PM »
Jeanette and Charles Hajdamach saw this "Studio" range introduced at the Birmingham Trade Fair in the mid 1980's (1986 was mentioned first, followed by a thought about why it could well have been 1985 on a journey up to Stourbridge to view the Cyril Manley Sale).

Hello Nigel, for what it's worth, when I researched my blue RBS vase for selling on (photo linked earlier on in this thread) the date that came up in my delving was 'the mid 1980's' - unfortunately, I don't have my sources to hand since I sold this quite a few months ago now but your 1985 date sounds better to me than the initial 1978 suggested.


Offline MarkHill

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Re: Royal Brierley
« Reply #22 on: January 29, 2007, 02:03:56 PM »
Hi All,

Nigel and Jeanette are, of course, quite right - not that a fresh-faced newbie such as me would question their experience, expertise and research anyway!

The Studio at RB and the RB Studio Range are different things, the former later than the latter I believe. I know nothing about the former, but can help with the latter.

It was indeed Michael Harris who designed the Royal Brierley Studio range - the iridescent ranges produced in a deep blue/black, pink, and clear/white, which have an acid stamp to the base. I recall being told that the darkest range was called something like 'Shadow Wave', but I may have mis-remembered the name. I've seen baluster and globe-ish vases in different sizes and shapes, table centrepiece type fruit bowls, and half a million perfume atomisers!

The range was based on designs from a range designed by MH and in production at Isle of White Studio Glass at the time - Ribbons, Lace, Silk & Satin. The specific designs used were Silk & Lace. I need to check exactly which one as I believe that there was some confusion as to which exact design was called Silk, Satin or Lace when I was doing my research with the Harrises. I will get back to you on this one as I know I now have the right piece of paper at home, ie; a recently discovered original sales flyer showing the three designs, each with their correct name. It was particularly the finish, iridescence and colours of the base glass that were used for RB's range.

As Nigel says, RB were modernising, but also wanted to take advantage of the rising interest in handmade 'Studio' glass. They needed something that could be produced at their Tipton plant mechanically and efficiently (often using moulds already in existence, for example light fittings) but gave the visual impression of being handmade.

I have seen a very exciting large globe vase, in a colour and pattern very close to the darkest Studio range colourway, that is signed 'TMH 86 C' of similar - for 'Copyright Timothy Mark Harris 1986'. This was made at IOWSG and has been confirmed by Timothy Harris as the sample/prototype piece he made with his father for presentation to RB. This of course also helps us with a date - 1986. I also know that a Ltd company was founded in 1988 to primarily handle income/documents from RB, further pinning dates down. All of this is in my book, specifically pp67 and 112-113, and I'll also be including 1 page on the glass in next year's 'DK Collectables Price Guide 2008 by Judith Miller' and I, due for release in early Autumn this year.

However, try as I might, I could not find any other related documents anywhere. The Harris archive sadly does not appear to contain anything else - I used what was there and what Elizabeth and Timothy Harris remembered. Maybe I contacted and visited the wrong people at RB - who knows? I'd love to have seen a catalogue, for example, for range names and shapes produced at the very least. If RB produced a catalogue each year, these would of course show when the range came in and was withdrawn, and how it was marketed.
Hope this helps confirm things a little more - plenty more work to be done on this one tho!!
All the best,
Mark
www.markhillpublishing.com


Text and images © Mark Hill
www.markhillpublishing.com


Offline sph@ngw

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Re: Royal Brierley
« Reply #23 on: January 30, 2007, 05:20:26 PM »
sadly I've been in this industry long enough and am old enough to remember Colonel Reggie Williams -Thomas and his son David launching Studio Glass. "We felt that we should have a more creative side to Royal Brierley and encourage young designers like Catherine to make someting a bit more modern"
Sadly it was the right idea but too soon and not followed through. "The Studio Movement" really got under way in the mid 1980's and this initiative fell foul of the early Eighties recession and when I next asked about it at a meeting I was told "Oh, you know these artists, rather temperamental!We've closed that!"
But a second try was made in the eary Nineties, I also recall and have two white Royal Brierley Studio vases, one plain and one with a flower transfer on it(!) It makes me laugh each time I see it!
when one sees some of the marvellous Studio pieces that sister company Stevens and Williams made......some as good as Whitefriars at its best inmho! ;)


Offline Frank

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Re: Royal Brierley
« Reply #24 on: November 15, 2012, 02:34:05 PM »
Unclear in this thread with conflicting statements.... But I get period 1 1978-1982 and period to later 80s or even 90s to ??? And which period did MH design for?
Frank A.
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Offline keith

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Re: Royal Brierley
« Reply #25 on: October 10, 2013, 04:52:34 PM »
Been trying to dig up more on RB'y studio,so far not much,Catherine Hough answered me saying that after setting up in 1978 she did her own 'thing' then moved on and presumed the studio closed so had no more information.I did have a very interesting phone call from Arlon Bayliss,ma,RCA (Professor at Anderson University,Indianapolis )
who was senior lecturer at Stourbridge college of art,he told me about the Harris family,numerous other glassworkers inc' Jane Beebe,Jill Devine and Bill Davies.
    He worked with David Williams when the 'Foundry'  studio was set up using old equipment from the Stevens & Williams factory,1983,spent 10 years,I think he said,designing for Rosenthal then moved to the States.
      I'm still waiting to hear from a few other sources,if anything new comes to light....I'll be back ! 8) ;D ;D


Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Royal Brierley
« Reply #26 on: October 10, 2013, 05:10:21 PM »
I'm wishing you all the best of good fortune getting this all sorted and worked out Keith.  8)
Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche


Offline keith

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Re: Royal Brierley
« Reply #27 on: October 10, 2013, 07:25:12 PM »
Thanks Sue,it's really hard finding anything considering how recent it was, ;D ;D


Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Royal Brierley
« Reply #28 on: October 10, 2013, 07:40:09 PM »
Mdina was the same, in 2000.
No info. anywhere, until Lesley Jackson made a mention of it in the Isle of Wight section of "20th Century factory Glass"(published in 2000)
I found one b&w thumbnail image in an ancient Miller's guide.
And it was not a typical piece.

Folk do not realise they are making history as they are working - nothing gets written down... ::)
Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche


Offline keith

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Re: Royal Brierley
« Reply #29 on: October 10, 2013, 11:18:28 PM »
I might put  a letter in the local paper,Black Country Bugle,and ask if any of the readers worked there or know of anyone that did,I've seen this work before so I'll give it a go,who knows what might turn up, ::) ::) ;D ;D

 

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