Author Topic: Bagley Elf  (Read 3430 times)

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Offline Glen

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Bagley Elf
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2004, 07:59:05 PM »
Just for interest - I always use the term "as moulded" for items that have had no secondary shaping etc., after removal from the mould. This convention works very well in Carnival Glass terminology and is in general use. Vases, in particular, were often shaped and swung after being removed from their moulds. Those which weren't altered in any way were simply "as moulded".
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Offline Bernard C

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Bagley Elf
« Reply #11 on: December 07, 2004, 05:48:59 AM »
Quote from: "Glen"
Just for interest - I always use the term "as moulded" for items that have had no secondary shaping etc., after removal from the mould. This convention works very well in Carnival Glass terminology and is in general use. ...

Glen:

Thanks for that, although I would rate the non-proliferation of confusing alternative terminology as far more important than "Just for interest".   I certainly do not want to go down in history as another Heacock & Gamble.   Recently I was reading their editorial on Northwood's Opaline Brocade pattern in Book 9, and found myself laughing at the muddle they got themselves in by their desperate and completely unnecessary attempts to rename it Spanish Lace!   And, if you have your 2B pencil handy, yes, it was a plagiarised version of the Walsh pattern, launched 14 months earlier in November 1897.   Your note should go alongside the caption to the first photograph on p.62.

And, while I am on the subject, the finest example of Opaline Brocade to be seen on public display anywhere is the fabulous Walsh 7-flute epergne in canary opalescent with green rim tape and matching base, oddly located in the centre of a display cabinet of Stuart's historic glass in the shop at the Red House glass cone.   I call in every year or two, just to drool over it!

Back to topic.  Glen, I have put a health warning on reply No. 1 above.   Okay?

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright © 2004–14 Bernard Cavalot


 

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