Author Topic: Vasart paperweight, what happened here then?  (Read 346 times)

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Offline Nick77

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Vasart paperweight, what happened here then?
« on: January 20, 2014, 04:18:54 PM »
At first when I got this Vasart weight, I thought it was a spaced cane set up of a design I'd not seen before, but then I realised there were indentations in the ground where twists should be and on closer inspection it seemed as if the imprints of latticino twist were in fact embedded in the ground.

This seemed even stranger, where had they gone to? Then holding at an angle to the light you can make out the ghostly remains of the latticino twists in some locations as if clear glass had been used instead of white in others nothing remains at all. In a couple of places the very faintest of white traces can just be made out, you can just see one at the 7 o'clock position in the first photo and the clear twist remains are visible in the second photo.

So any ideas as to what happened? Was the dome gather too hot and melted the latticino? Was there a problem with the white glass used? Did they come up with a magic disappearing glass formula? Has anyone seen this before?

It's 73mm (2 7/8") diameter.

Nick


Offline w8happiness

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Re: Vasart paperweight, what happened here then?
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2014, 05:07:35 PM »
Hello Nick,

very very fascinating! I have found a similar phenomenon in a Paul Ysart harlequin weight with H signature, and another in a double harlequin from Caithness times, it bears a inversed PY signature in the base...
I call these spokes "invisible spokes canes" because they only show up when viewed from the end side, just a rippled transparent ghost when viewed from top side.

Some of Vasart spokes have "bleached" or "thinned out" elements, but your's shows (or better: don't show) the most invisible spokes I have ever seen!

Kind regards, Erhard.
...it is very hard to take pictures of the above mentioned "invisible canes"-  ;-(
EJM


Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Vasart paperweight, what happened here then?
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2014, 05:16:18 PM »
I suppose it is possible there was a batch of canes made with the white too "sparsely" included to show up in the final product.

When glass is red hot, it's very difficult for a maker to know what colour of glass s/he is using - it's all just red-hot and glowing.
Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche


Offline Nick77

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Re: Vasart paperweight, what happened here then?
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2014, 10:42:58 AM »
Thanks for the replies, not seen it before and was very puzzled. I like the term invisible spoke canes ;D might have to use that when I sell it.

Nick


Offline w8happiness

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Re: Vasart paperweight, what happened here then?
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2014, 02:54:11 PM »
...it would sit very comfortably in MY little Vasart crowd!!... seriously,
I think I won't refuse a bid should you put it out for auction!
At last, those spokes are really "invisible"- much like a lenticular lens picture,

kind regards, Erhard
EJM


Offline Sach

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Re: Vasart paperweight, what happened here then?
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2014, 04:41:37 PM »
It is certainly possible that clear canes were positioned in the set-up to maintain the spacing of the other elements.  It also possible that the white has "faded out".  There are essentially two ways to make white glass.  Enamel white glasses are made using arsenic and remain white throughout the heating cycle.  White glass can also be made using a phosphate based pigmentation.  Historically bone ash was a common source for the phosphate.  Phosphate whites tend to be a bit paler, less dense in color, than do the enamel whites.  They also go thru a phase change as they pass thru the heating/cooling cycle.  The white color completely disappears when the glass is molten and reappears as the glass cools.  This phase change is due to the formation of crystals within the glass and can be affected by alterations in the speed of heating and cooling.  It is certainly possible that the intervening clear canes are made using such a white glass and the white color failed to emerge upon cooling.


Offline Derek

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Re: Vasart paperweight, what happened here then?
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2014, 05:29:40 PM »
Hi Nick

I read this post with interest and I think there there is a simpler explanation.

That is that the radial twists were simply not picked up when the gather was lowered onto the set up, this would leave an indentation AND could also leave a faint impression of the white spiral as when latticinio is made it is not cased - iE the white is on the surface.

I contacted Dave Moir (Ysart Brothers,  Vasart and Strathearn : 1954 - 1980) to get his comments.

Dave said............

"Had a look at the Vasart weight  Looks like it was picked up when the mould was not hot enough and rather than bin it they carrried on. I've seen the rods fall out and we made dishes out of them and sold them in the showroom"

With this design of weight all canes other than the latticinio spiral are picked up on the cross section of the cane - IE a good contact between the cane and the gather whereas the spiral canes are picked up on a smooth  radiused surface  and so are far less secure.

Best regards

Derek


Offline Nick77

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Re: Vasart paperweight, what happened here then?
« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2014, 06:05:25 PM »
Hi

Derek many thanks but the twists are there, they cane be seen in the second photo albeit transparent and there are 3 or 4 places where faint white strands are actually visible.

Best regards
Nick


Offline Fuhrman Glass

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Re: Vasart paperweight, what happened here then?
« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2014, 07:34:28 PM »
when pulling long lengths of cane the ones near the pulling end many times will diminish in their intensity. This may have been the case on this item. the closer you normally get to the initial gather the more distinct the color stays. As was stated the phosphate white will not retain it's color as well as the enamel/arsenic white. the longer you stretch it the more faint it appears. I've had some of my latticino cane that I made do almost the same thing. It just seems to disappear when used in a weight.


Offline w8happiness

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Re: Vasart paperweight, what happened here then?
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2014, 08:11:36 AM »
Yes, I think "diminish the intesity" hits the spot,
I try and upload a picture of the Ysart Harland weight,
the arrow points at the area (red circle) where the
translucent latticinio part is located; there are more
such pieces, and the same type, but not as faint, as well...

I don't know how well it shows, kind regards, Erhard
EJM

 

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