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Author Topic: Lovely minature Vasart but even better description  (Read 1095 times)

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Offline millarart

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Lovely minature Vasart but even better description
« on: May 15, 2006, 06:43:06 PM »
Hi there to all,
                     just been touring throught EBay and came across alovely little minature Vasart vase item number http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7414798889 , the seller is from Perth and has some cracking pieces in at times, but the best things i like about his items are the descriptions well worth having a read :lol: anyway i shall leave it in your hands to have a look and a read
                   Gary


Offline Frank

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Lovely minature Vasart but even better description
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2006, 07:40:51 PM »
Oh dear, disinformation, from that it would seem that the book, Ian Turner, my website and the Ysart family ALL got it wrong :o

Anyway, just to set the record straight:

THE STORY BEGAN WITH ISOBEL MONCRIEFFE, HER IDEAS AND INSPIRATION – THE YSARTS WERE JUST TOOLS FOR HER GRANDE DESIGNS,

Completely wrong. The idea came from Salvador Ysart, Isobel Moncrieff (No 'e'. Moncrieffe is the spelling of the large island in the river Tay.) championed the production by Moncrieff until she left the company in the early 1930's. As was revealed by Ian Turner at the Perth Conference in 2005 there is a very strong case that the designs were developed by both Paul and Isobel. Written notes on the master drawing are all in Paul Ysart's handwriting. Perhaps the MOST IMPORTANT discovery about the glass since the book was published and still not mentioned on the ysartglass website.

 FAST FORWARD THE CLOCK TO THE VASART DAYS, TAKE TIME AND STOP HERE, THIS WAS WHEN THIS DAINTY GIRLIE LITTLE VASE WAS MANUFACTURED BY HAND.

A MULTITUDE OF SAID FRIGGERS…THE TERM HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH...

Friggers are something else, this was a standard production piece.

...ACTUALLY ARE CRUSHED COLOURED GLASS FRAGMENTS PLACED AT RANDOM WITHIN THE GROUND...

Incorrect, the ground colouring could be described as crushed glass, but the normal term is enamels.

The 'blobs' of colour in Vasart and Strathearn are small pieces of the same canes that were used for paperweights. They were not crushed but flattened and spread out in the shaping process.
Frank A.
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Offline millarart

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Lovely minature Vasart but even better description
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2006, 11:13:00 PM »
Hi there,
               i was at the conference and im sure that Ian Turner did mention the fact that designs were thought of by Paul Ysart and Isobel Moncrief   its just a pity this wasnt available when the book was written also i always thought that friggers were pieces /items of glass that were made during breaks ect and found there way out the back door without the owners knowing off them so they could be giving as gifts or sold maybe for beer money, am i right in thinking this????????????


Offline Frank

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Lovely minature Vasart but even better description
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2006, 08:50:15 AM »
Friggers were the glassworkers perks, made in their own time. But the bosses were aware. Benefit to the bosses was that they could get away with lower salaries and their workforce improved their skills.

Also known as Whimsies.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
Scotland's Glass - Ysart Glass
Glass Zoo - Glass Study.COM
Commercial Czech


 



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