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Author Topic: Stevens and Williams Arboresque question  (Read 1221 times)

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Offline flying free

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Re: Stevens and Williams Arboresque question
« Reply #50 on: February 18, 2014, 03:55:33 PM »
With reference Mike's post just above here
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,55630.msg315647.html#msg315647
linking to a vase shown as Arabesque Stevens and Williams (I would describe the linked vase as Frilled (possibly trailed but could be clear pink glass showing above casing)rim, bright pink interior, cased in white and then with a crackle layer over it, applied feet)
I accidentally happened upon this one in Broadfield House Museum - it looks to be done in a similar way to the linked vase

http://gorgeousglass.org.uk/collections/getrecord/DMUSE_BH1093/
Description reads:
'Maker:        possibly Stevens and Williams
Description: Bowl, interior of bowl pink glass cased with white, followed by a layer of clear glass, followed by crackled citron casing, with three applied leaf shape feet, rim with clear and white opalescent applied trail, known as ""arabesque"" by JF Wood'

The Broadfield House description is difficult to understand as pertains the word 'arabesque' because of the way the sentence is constructed.  It could mean the rim with clear and white opalescent applied trail is known by JF Wood as 'arabesque'.  It could mean the bowl is made by JF Wood?
But is a crackle piece and listed as possibly Stevens and Williams. 
m


Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: Stevens and Williams Arboresque question
« Reply #51 on: February 18, 2014, 04:42:56 PM »
You've pasted the wrong second link M


bfg

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Re: Stevens and Williams Arboresque question
« Reply #52 on: February 18, 2014, 04:43:59 PM »
I think that the crackled citron casing is very distinctive - in most other examples tendered as arbor / arab esque it has been an opaque white outer cased crackle hasn't it? Could this be key in getting to the bottom of the issue?

Still rueing the passing on of my Crystal Years, who was JF Wood? bet it says in there :-(


Offline flying free

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Re: Stevens and Williams Arboresque question
« Reply #53 on: February 18, 2014, 04:44:46 PM »
oh darn it - thanks Christine  ;D I'm going to have to go and find it again now - happened on it by accident.

phew - thankfully they key=worded 'arabesque'
corrected above and here it is
http://gorgeousglass.org.uk/collections/getrecord/DMUSE_BH1093/

it does actually have a good similarity with the one Mike linked to in terms of decor.  I think the one linked to is also cased in clear?  Certainly the pics look similar - perhaps that's what 'old clear' looks like cased over white maybe?
I'm not entirely sure how or whether these two bowls fit in to the case, but like Mel I do wonder whether there has been some confusion maybe?
Mel, I'll see if JF Wood is mentioned in there and get back to you.
m



bfg

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Re: Stevens and Williams Arboresque question
« Reply #54 on: February 18, 2014, 04:56:20 PM »
doesn't it say cased in clear then with an outer citron crackled layer? I'm seeing outer most citron crackle, presumably over clear over white (working in) in both GG and Mikes Pintrest pics?

Thanks m, be good to know now he's come up on the radar


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Re: Stevens and Williams Arboresque question
« Reply #55 on: February 18, 2014, 05:02:15 PM »
yes you're right, my brain was working on why it had been cased in clear and so forgot the citron.
Sorry Mel  :)
ok, I can't seem to find JF Wood in the book The Crystal Years and I'm wondering if they say on that new link possibly Stevens and Williams or Boulton and Mills, that maybe that description note was referring to  a JF Wood who worked for the museum perhaps?
I'll need to do a little searching ... but have to make dinner in a mo - eek, I get so distracted  ;D
m


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Re: Stevens and Williams Arboresque question
« Reply #56 on: February 18, 2014, 05:09:49 PM »
http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/engraved-stevens-williams-hunt-goblet-250835879

This was sold as a Stevens and Willliams goblet with a Bill Swingewood lampwork in it.  It is engraved (lovely , I've never seen anything like this before) and the engraving is signed J Wood.
Could JF Wood be one of the engravers at Stevens and Williams perhaps?
m


Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: Stevens and Williams Arboresque question
« Reply #57 on: February 18, 2014, 08:44:03 PM »
The museum bowl I could go with as Stevens and Williams; the other looks much more Bohemian (Harrach?) despite the citron crackle IMHO


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Re: Stevens and Williams Arboresque question
« Reply #58 on: February 18, 2014, 10:11:50 PM »
I always find these things really difficult.  For me, looking at them side by side, I honestly can't see any difference in the basic construction - they look to have both been done in the same way using the same 'stuff'and look to be from the same maker.  I think lighting plays a big part as well as the design so it is difficult to tell e.g. I love the bowl on the GG site, but  the shape of the one linked to leaves me cold.
 However, I did notice on clicking through to the finished ebay listing for it, that it has a pinched in the middle rim and a beautifully polished pontil mark (veering to English), but then I noticed the rim shape which is a peculiar in out square crimp shape that I've had before (and is in Gulliver's no id), and didn't know where my piece had originated (veering towards now unsure - could be Boulton and Mills? or possibly Bohemian?).
Ebay link here with clickable pictures that enlarge to see the detail.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/STEVENS-AND-WILLIAMS-ARABESQUE-ART-GLASS-VASE-W-APPLIED-CLEAR-FEET-CLAM-SHELL-/251412524789?nma=true&si=tznYn5dbNwf63OpQ4XfOXtBb4KI%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557


I think the person who is selling the bowl on ebay, found the bowl in Gorgeous Glass and put two and two together - a good find I think.  I can see the connection and feel on balance I would think that they could possibly be from the same maker.

However, either way,  as Mike mentioned earlier, is it possible that the name/description of  'arabesque' has got confused with Arboresque in some way?  Looking at Manley's description I think it is possible, however looking at BGbtW Roger Dodsworth's description I don't think so ' - see quote from Kev below

'BGBTW, page 99, catalogue #331, [sadly not illustrated] was a bowl in "... a style known as Arboresque, introduced in 1933". The description says:
Quote
Clear glass, blown into an irregular patterned mould and sprayed with orange metallic salts
.'

mmm, not a lot further forward unfortunately.
I don't suppose it's possible for the 'Glass Message Board' to send an 'official' request for enlightenment to the Broadfield House Museum is it?
m


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Re: Stevens and Williams Arboresque question
« Reply #59 on: February 20, 2014, 12:28:33 AM »
I have just trawled many Fieldings auctions and found 6 vases and bowls in blues and greens spirals (in the decor we would refer to as rainbow), some cut, including the one referenced in BGbtW Dodworth with the cut oval windows on it.  It just so happens all with blue and green (jade green?), none with pink (rose?) and green (jade green?)
Without exception  they are all called Stevens and Williams and referred to as 1930s,but not a single one is described as 'Rainbow' or 'rainbow' or 'Rainbow Ware' or rainbow in any shape or form.
I have to believe that if this was a formally identified range name then they would be.

In The Crystal Years the author lists various range names apparently in order of period designed.
So as follows:
Rose du Barry c.1888
Verre de Soie c.1886
Moss Agate  no date in book but  British Glass  1800-1914 gives it as c 1888
Alexandrite c1890
Dolce Relivo c.1890
Latticino  no date given
Fibrillose c.1901
Silveria c.1900
Fleurissant c.1915
Vitrolux 1916
Tortoiseshell mid 1930s
Caerleon  refers to 'In 1919..' because in 1919 the Lighting factory developed a new range in this decor.  I don't 'think' it was called Caerleon at that point though on reading the description in CH British Glass 20th Century.  I think Caerleon was a name given to this decor later on.
Arboresque Early 1930s

Arboresque falls at the end and is said to be early 1930s.

I think it's entirely possible that The Crystal Years description of 'Arboresque' being
'This was a treatment carried out in the early 1930s and used a glasshouse effect of trailed uneven coloured glass, mainly of jade green and rose, on to the surface of clear crystal articles'
refers to those vases we on the board call rainbow.


I can't see the  crackle glass bowls that we've found, either those described as 'Arabesque' nor the one in Manley's book,nor the one I first linked to, nor this one that I've only just found that is from that same collection (the 'Andy and Rob Collection') as the one I first linked to
http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/5715223
particularly being a 1930s new design. 

Neither do the two bowls found, nor the two from the 'Andy and Rob Collection, nor Manley's bowl 285, seem to particularly match the description given by Dodsworth or Manley for 'Arboresque'  I don't think as from my point of view none are iridescent:
Manley - 'Stevens and Williams, in 4 colours. Recorded as 'Arboresque' in 1930. Crystal over cracked iridescent surface
Dodsworth - '... a style known as Arboresque, introduced in 1933' and 'Clear glass, blown into an irregular patterned mould and sprayed with orange metallic salts.'

I'm not entirely sure about the link Fred gave to the vaseline glass site piece, but his piece doesn't appear to fit the description of any of the three authors and his description doesn't mention 'iridescent' at all -
it says '... A design that was unique to Stevens & Williams was ARBORESQUE and is a crackle effect that is internal.  This style came in a lot of shapes and at least 4 different colors.  This version is vaseline with blue accents and handles.'

So perhaps they fit the apparently unknown description of 'Arabesque' rather than 'Arboresque'?  Whilst the bowls we know as rainbow do fit the description of 'Arboresque' given in The Crystal Years.

Perhaps there has been some confusion between this design 'known as' Arabesque, and the range of 'Arboresque?

With regards the spiral multicoloured decor we know as rainbow fitting the description of 'tree-like', I would say that all the vases I've found online have jade green in them which could be said to represent trees. The pink and green could be interpreted as tree branches with blossom and the pink and blue, tree branches with sky?
An arbor can also be described as 'a shelter of vines or branches or of latticework covered with climbing shrubs or vines' (Merriam-Webster dictionary)
I think the rainbow decor fits that well.

I've put two links here, one to a pink and green vase we know as rainbow, the other to the blue and green version just for reference:
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,42704.msg237570.html#msg237570
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/albums/userpics/10318/DSCF1198.jpg

For the fourth colour (as Manley asserts it came in 4 colours, though as I've said he may have been confusing arabesque and 'Arboresque' in which case his mention of the 4 colours would refer to arabesque I guess), but in the case of those vases we know as rainbow, that would be clear as many of the versions show clear as well as the two colours.  So the colours are Jade green, Rose, Blue and Clear.


So do we have perhaps have a new decor and pattern name match?

m


 

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