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Author Topic: Whitefriars yard ale question  (Read 2669 times)

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Offline Frank

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Whitefriars yard ale question
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2006, 11:55:52 AM »
Balanced on a pint of Ale perhaps :twisted:, or the opening finished after.
Frank A.
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Offline Patrick

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Whitefriars yard ale question
« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2006, 01:30:14 PM »
Hi, I have spoken to the man that knows.............. They were "knocked off" the blowing iron and then stood up against the gloryhole to allow the bulb end to cool but the end requiring finishing to stay warm. It was then held by the now cool bulb end and slowly reheated in the glory hole. It was then "sheared off" and finished as you would a rim to a vase.
 Regards Patrick...


Offline aa

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Whitefriars yard ale question
« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2006, 02:13:34 PM »
Thanks, Patrick...you probably didn't realise my question was really tongue in cheek. The point about the yard of ale is that it is one of the very few shapes that can be made without annealing and that can be cooled down to a temperature that can be handled at one end (just above room temperature) while the other hand can be re-heated to about 900 degrees in the glory hole. These propertiess are related to the actual method of blowing which involves  very little stress developing in the glass as it is actually being blown.

In many glass factories/studios yards of ale were and still are made as official/unofficial friggers at weekends and then exchanged for suitable liquid refreshments in local pubs!!
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Offline vidrioguapo

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« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2006, 03:21:34 PM »
Tongue in cheek or not, it was an interesting question and the answer equally interesting.  something I at least didn't know and possibly others.  thanks for that.


Offline aa

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Whitefriars yard ale question
« Reply #15 on: May 27, 2006, 03:34:16 PM »
One of these days we might get round to organising a demonstration. It is quite visual! :D
Hello & Welcome to the Board! Sometimes my replies are short & succinct, other times lengthy. Apologies in advance if they are not to your satisfaction; my main concern is to be accurate for posterity & to share my limited knowledge
For information on exhibitions & events and to see images of my new work join my Facebook group
https://www.facebook.com/adamaaronsonglass
Introduction to Glassblowing course:a great way to spend an afternoon http://www.zestgallery.com/glass.


 

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