Glass Discussion & Research. No ID requests here please. > British & Irish Glass

Pink satin glass vase... ID = Sowerby 2437 drape vase

<< < (4/4)

Wayne:
Hi Anne, thank you for the compliments about the website!  I plan to add loads more info when I can find time, but thanks to eBay I seem to spend most of my time packing up glass for posting!  I would love to add any pictures you can send, as long as it's not too much trouble for you.

I've got the pink Sowerby lady and bowl item listed on ebay now if you're interested.  The following link should take you to it:
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3771797467

As for your question on why flower frogs are called 'frogs', I'm not exactly sure.  As far as I am aware, it was a slang term that became popular, probably for the reason you mention, that they 'sit in water'.

Best wishes, I hope everyone had a wonderful Christmas!!

Adam:
I had never heard of the word "frog" until I joined this message board!

At Sowerby's and Davidson's we called them (and sold them as) flower blocks for the round and oval heavy things and flower holders for the other, variously shaped things.  The word "flower" was naturally omitted in everyday usage.

I can only assume that "frog", like "cranberry" is something dreamed up by collectors.

Adam D.

Anne:
That's interesting Adam, thank you for clarifying it. On a whim I checked my Universal Dictionary and frog is defined there as "A spiked or perforated object placed in a container and used to support stems in a decorative floral arrangement", but there is no etymology for this particular usage so I still don't know where it started. :roll:


--- Quote from: "Wayne" ---I would love to add any pictures you can send, as long as it's not too much trouble for you.
--- End quote ---


No problem, I'll snaffle the digicam off my other half and see what I can do. :)


--- Quote from: "Wayne" ---I've got the pink Sowerby lady and bowl item listed on ebay now if you're interested.
--- End quote ---


It's lovely but you're listing at the wrong time! ... it's just after Xmas and I (and probably others!) am all spent up... unless I can persuade my other half he'd like it for his birthday next week I may have to pass at the moment.  :wink:

Frank:
"Frog" is applied to all sorts of things, apart from glass and flowers, that comprise a means of keeping things in place. My references say that the origin of the term is not known but goes back far in the past.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[*] Previous page

Go to full version