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Author Topic: Not seen one like this before.  (Read 620 times)

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Offline Nick77

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Not seen one like this before.
« on: August 01, 2014, 12:21:16 PM »
I picked this up for a couple of pounds today, as you can see it's badly bashed and bruised but I bought it because I've not seen one before.

It is I think on first appearance a fairly standard printed paper based Victorian/Edwardian weight of probably the Duke of Wellington, but I've not seen one with a stepped base encased in copper as this one is. Has anyone seen others and have any information on these?

Nick

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Offline tropdevin

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Re: Not seen one like this before.
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2014, 01:26:50 PM »
***

Hi Nick.  These are sometimes (wrongly) referred to as Pinchbeck weights, as the stepped glass dome and copper / pewter / marble bases are similarly made.  There are some high quality versions around where the image is a detailed painting on the back of a glass disk - commonly Victoria and Albert - dating to the mid 19th century.  I would suspect a printed paper design would be later.

Alan
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Offline Nick77

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Re: Not seen one like this before.
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2014, 02:00:03 PM »
Thanks Alan, but I am an idiot, looking with a magnifier and holding it in one hand to reach for a different larger magnification one I dropped it, the copper base which was already bent and distorted pinged off and revealed it was in fact hand painted on the back of a thin glass disc, but much of the paint has now come off!
I'm glad I only paid 3 for it.
Ah well at least I know how they're made now :(

Nick

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Offline tropdevin

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Re: Not seen one like this before.
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2014, 02:45:48 PM »
***

Hi Nick

Oh well....that is why older pieces get rarity value!  ;D

I have had several of these - usually Victoria and Albert pairs - and damage to the base and flaking paint seems to be common.  One even had a crack right across the glass, though it was hard to spot.  Ten years ago they commanded a higher price than they seem to do now - but you are still talking a 3 figure sum for each one if they are in very good condition.  I think that once the paint is starting to loose adhesion the value is minimal.

Alan 
Alan  (The Paperweight People  http://www.pwts.co.uk)

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Offline Nick77

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Re: Not seen one like this before.
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2014, 02:52:23 PM »
Hi Alan

It had some pretty deep bruises and the water involved to polish them out would have undoubtedly seeped into the base and affected the painting so it probably wasn't of too much value.

Whats left though I can now clearly see is incredibly well painted, especially as it is painted in reverse and miniature in size. A very talented artist indeed, certainly up there with some of the miniatures on ivory I've seen.

Nick

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Offline paperweights

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Re: Not seen one like this before.
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2014, 03:38:15 PM »
Very rare.  The positive side is we now know how they are made, although I suspect there may be several different types. 

For those who have Selman's first auction catalog from 1990, take a look at lot 53 "Painted weight with portrait of an elegant lady", 4 1/2" diameter; $1,600 to 2,000 estimate, sold for $2,320 including the 10% bidders premium. 

The auction listing points to other references including the Encyclopedia of Glass Paperweights by Hollister (page 183) and the Art of the Paperweight by Selman (page 92).  The weight in the Art of the Paperweight is the same as the one in the 1990 auction. 

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Offline Nick77

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Re: Not seen one like this before.
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2014, 03:55:21 PM »
Thanks Allan makes me feel a lot better ;D Now where are my oil paints and superglue?

Or perhaps I'll stick a printed picture of Bart Simpson in it and put it on ebay as a rare hand painted paperweight by a psychic artist from 1850 starting bid 3000 ;)

Nick

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Offline Nick77

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Re: Not seen one like this before.
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2014, 04:14:07 PM »
One thing had puzzled me, the two seemingly broken off pieces clearly visible when it came apart I assumed had pinged off somewhere when it hit the floor but a detailed crawl examination of the floor has not turned them up. And in fact the larger bottom missing section has a smooth/polished edge and appears to have been made this way and indeed when reassembled neither missing section is visible. Although the left side smaller piece has definitely been broken off I think this happened previously as it most certainly isn't here.So it tseems the base has previously been off/dropped before.

Nick

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