Author Topic: Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?  (Read 10843 times)

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Offline Anne

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #30 on: June 04, 2006, 10:23:53 PM »
Quote from: "DenCill"
While I think about it: Designer of Swirl?

There is a suspicion that it could have been Robert Goodden, who also designed Spiderweb. As yet unconfirmed.


Found an obituary for Robert Goodden which gives his association dates with Chance Glass which pre-date the date we have for Swirl (1955):
Quote
Also in the early Thirties began Goodden's involvement with the industrial manufacturers Chance Brothers, designing mass-produced pressed domestic glassware, a relationship that continued until 1948.

Source: The Independent 13 April 2002 transcribed here


Offline David E

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #31 on: June 04, 2006, 10:40:13 PM »
Quote from: "Max"
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So... that being the case, this could mean that ALL 'Swirl' with overlapping gilt is actually another make, like Twist...


You mention the boxes in your subsequent posting David.  Is it worth getting my swirl box out and photographing it?

Thanks Max. It wasn't me who mentioned it, but I suppose we do need any proof of definite Swirl patterns. Oh what a tangled web we weave... :roll:

Quote
Also in the early Thirties began Goodden's involvement with the industrial manufacturers Chance Brothers, designing mass-produced pressed domestic glassware, a relationship that continued until 1948.

Anne: That would fit as Goodden also designed Lotus (1948), but I wonder how reliable it is. Perhaps Goodden took on the odd commission afterwards? More confirmation needed.
David
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Offline Anne

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #32 on: June 04, 2006, 11:51:51 PM »
After 1948 he designed for various places e.g. Wedgewood, but was primarily a professor at the RCA, and then involved with the Festival of Britain and some prestigious commissions - such as a kettle for the Duke of Edinburgh (it was a Xmas pressie for the Queen apparently!) I've read all the obits I can find online (around 6 of them) and they all include slightly varied detail but they all refer to the glass designs as either during the time Goodden had his own design practice (1933-39) or before 1948.


Offline David E

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #33 on: June 05, 2006, 07:59:36 AM »
Thanks for that: I wasn't doubting this, but from past experience it's unwise to rely on a single written report. But if this information is being substantiated that's fair enough.
David
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Offline Anne

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #34 on: June 05, 2006, 06:02:12 PM »
I also checked the Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) as our county libraries have a remote access deal with them (in fact most libraries subscribe) and their very detailed bio substantiates what I read in the Goodden obits as well.

What I haven't been able to find is any supporting evidence for the alleged Casson designs - all I find when searching for Casson and Glass are the endless eBay items. I did read that there's something in Jackson's 20th Century Factory Glass about this but as I don't have a copy I cannot confirm. Can someone with the book check the reference for Margaret Casson and see if there's a quoted source for the info please?


Offline robbo

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #35 on: June 05, 2006, 07:59:16 PM »
Quote from: "Anne"
Can someone with the book check the reference for Margaret Casson and see if there's a quoted source for the info please?


Anne,
Lesley Jackson mentions Swirl, dates it to 1955, production to "mid-1960s" and describes it as "a pin-wheel pattern printed in dove grey". It goes on to say "Swirl was followed by a knobbly-line pattern called Night Sky (1957), inspired by diagrams of stellar formations, which was designed by Margaret Casson, along with Green Leaves (1958)." So she gives no designer for Swirl. There are no references for the Casson attributions of Night Sky and Green Leaves.
robbo
robbo


Offline David E

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #36 on: June 05, 2006, 08:04:07 PM »
Quote from: "robbo"
Quote from: "Anne"
Can someone with the book check the reference for Margaret Casson and see if there's a quoted source for the info please?


Anne,
Lesley Jackson mentions Swirl, dates it to 1955, production to "mid-1960s" and describes it as "a pin-wheel pattern printed in dove grey". It goes on to say "Swirl was followed by a knobbly-line pattern called Night Sky (1957), inspired by diagrams of stellar formations, which was designed by Margaret Casson, along with Green Leaves (1958)." So she gives no designer for Swirl. There are no references for the information.
robbo

Robbo,
I'm not entirely conviced that Swirl finished production in the mid-60s. I have one of Chance's publicity card, early 1970s, that promotes the gilt version of Swirl, but there is not mention of it in the 1976 price list.

However, I do respect LJs opinion in not attributing it to Margaret Casson. I'd still like to know who to give credit to though!
David
► Chance Additions ◄
The 2nd volume of the domestic glassware of Chance Brothers
Contact ► Cortex Design ◄ to order any book


Offline Frank

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #37 on: June 05, 2006, 08:16:11 PM »
But sufficiently badly edited that it easy to see why literate eBayers would misread it. It has a comma in it for one. After the first few sell well, people take notes and  :idea:  a myth.
Frank A.
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Offline David E

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #38 on: June 05, 2006, 08:25:08 PM »
Quote
Swirl was followed by a knobbly-line pattern called Night Sky (1957), inspired by diagrams of stellar formations, which was

But the key is in the words "which was". Singular and refering to the last item: Night Sky. Hard to see how people could have mistaken this. Blinkered with rose-tinted specs at the same time! :)
David
► Chance Additions ◄
The 2nd volume of the domestic glassware of Chance Brothers
Contact ► Cortex Design ◄ to order any book


Offline robbo

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #39 on: June 05, 2006, 09:26:22 PM »
Quote from: "DenCill"
Blinkered with rose-tinted specs at the same time! :)


David,
I agree entirely, including C20th "Roadshow" Experts. I'm sure, if I remember correctly, Margaret Casson was named as designer when they did Chance Swirl :lol:.

Anyway, here's more overlapping gold. A three sectioned rectangular dish. Here's the edge. The edge is basically ground flat, with a very slight bevel on the top (but not on the bottom of the edge) that I think is similar to that mentioned by Sue. The swirls are in the right direction and they go the the very edge of the underneath.
Hope this helps.
robbo
robbo

 

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