Author Topic: Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?  (Read 10549 times)

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Offline Lustrousstone

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #50 on: July 23, 2006, 01:14:10 PM »
More Swirling :shock:  :shock: Two black with gold clockwise Swirls, 12 flutes, 8 inch diameter. Rim gilding overlap on one barely on the other. Gilding looks like that on the Night Sky set. The glass is actually Ruby but the only way you can tell is by holding it up to the light. The swirls also do the one in, one out in the centre. Photo to follow (I'm supposed to be washing today's purchases, then doing some housework :cry: 0


Offline David E

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #51 on: July 23, 2006, 01:31:27 PM »
Ruby Swirl is an excellent design IMHO :D

I have since discovered that reverse swirls do appear on known Chance items, as do the alternating long-short central radial arms. Max's Ruby Swirl dish, featured on the site, shows reverse swirl as well, but this could be a result of printing on the topside (one of the few occurances of this on Chance items).

The overlapping gilt, though, is a little more controversial as Tony is adamant this didn't happen when he worked there and I assumed this could then only apply to earlier (pre-1960) patterns.

However, I have found some later silk-screen printed patterns (c.1965-on) that show the alternating central hole, so I suppose it all depends when this style was adopted and/or when Ruby Swirl was dropped.

I've actually started a bar-graph timeline to try and assimilate all this data!
David
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Offline Lustrousstone

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #52 on: July 23, 2006, 01:36:54 PM »
But these aren't ruby or anticlockwise. They're black - much, much darker than Max's - and clockwise swirling.


Offline David E

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #53 on: July 23, 2006, 01:43:52 PM »
Sorry, I wasn't comparing like-for-like there, merely pointing out that reverse (anti-clock) swirl is known on Ruby and probably as a consequence of reversing the transfer.

But the darker colour sounds mysterious. I have problems getting ruby to show red on my camera, but it does show well enough when backlit. Do you have another Ruby piece to compare it with Christine?
David
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Offline Lustrousstone

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #54 on: July 23, 2006, 02:04:43 PM »
Black Swirl one with flash, one without. Better photos on request. Click to enlarge

Offline David E

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #55 on: July 23, 2006, 03:35:12 PM »
I'm inclined to think this is 'normal' Ruby Swirl as they can appear quite dark when not lit from behind, even on a white background. Not easy to tell without another similar dish to compare with though.

Does look to be an extremely nice example though! :)
David
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Offline Lustrousstone

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #56 on: July 23, 2006, 04:34:10 PM »
I don't think they were ever intended to look ruby. The colour is so intense that it really does appear black, not a hint of red, unless you hold it up to the window or against a light

Offline Anne

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #57 on: July 23, 2006, 07:51:50 PM »
I've seen examples online that look as dark as Christine's too, but wasn't able to tell if they were poorly photographed ruby or intended to be black. They are much darker than the ones I've seen as ruby, so I think we have to consider these to be a separate colourway until proved otherwise now we've Christine's examples to judge by.

Offline David E

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #58 on: July 24, 2006, 10:43:15 AM »
Ruby Swirl can often look very dark. The reason being is that the ruby 'flashing' might not be consistent and a thicker coating would look dark. I think Max has backlit her plate better and along with a bit of image editing (by me) it will look slightly brighter. It is possible the way it was made, or the type of red glass used, differed for later Ruby Swirl as well.

I have never heard, rumoured, hinted at, of a 'black' Swirl and just think it is not wise or safe to imply there is a 'new' colourway until this dish has been compared with known ruby Swirl. Attached is an early photo I took, completely unedited apart from cropping/resizing.

 :shock: click to zoom :shock:
David
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Offline Lustrousstone

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Head in a Swirl, by any Chance?
« Reply #59 on: July 24, 2006, 11:54:03 AM »
If it's ruby flashed, it would have to have an awful lot of colorant for a thin layer to appear black. (It really looks as black as my Jobling plinth, which is really purple. We know that black glass isn't  black if you can get light to pass through it.) One plate has a couple of tiny edge chips, these too look black. I thought at first that they were where the gilding had worn. And we know that

And you wouldn't be  able to sell a plate as ruby if it only looked ruby when back lit - quality control can't have been that poor, especially as ruby colorants were/are expensive

 

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