Author Topic: Signed Cenedese- Scavo?  (Read 1518 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline lenore

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 86
Signed Cenedese- Scavo?
« on: June 13, 2006, 12:46:39 PM »
Hi,
I picked up this signed Cenedese piece from a local estate. I guess its a bowl or platter? Measures 16-1/4" across and 3-1/2" tall. I believe it is in the scavo technique. What's strange is the interior/top is about 80% shiny, smooth glass with only a small portion being acid washed. The base is entirely scavo in nature. Is this still considered scavo or do you call it something else? Guessing that this is from the 1980's???
Thanks for any info...
Lenore




Offline lenore

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 86
Signed Cenedese- Scavo?
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2006, 09:54:19 PM »
Or, is it coroso? The difference?
Many thanks!


Offline Max

  • Global Moderator
  • Members
  • *
  • Posts: 3473
  • Gender: Female
Signed Cenedese- Scavo?
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2006, 10:37:23 PM »
Scavo and corroso are the same thing, as far as I'm aware.  I suppose your bowl must have been polished after acid was applied to the top portions of the inner section - can't think how it was done otherwise!

Sorry can't help with attribution, lovely subtle colouring though!   :D
I am not a man


Offline svazzo

  • SVAZZO
  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 773
  • Gender: Male
    • www.SVAZZO.com
Signed Cenedese- Scavo?
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2006, 06:42:57 AM »
Hello Lenore,
Your piece is in the Scavo technique.
Scavo will usually have other colors within it, like darker smudges and white-ish areas, and looks like the treatment is on top of the glass. The Corroso technique is usually done with Sommerso Clear colors and looks like it is etched into the glass, where the Scavo looks added on top.
Hope this helps.
Javier
Offering Vintage and Antique Murano Glass  Free Shipping Worldwide!
www.SVAZZO.com


Offline Max

  • Global Moderator
  • Members
  • *
  • Posts: 3473
  • Gender: Female
Signed Cenedese- Scavo?
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2006, 06:58:25 AM »
Javier?  So...does Scavo and Corroso not really apply to the acid technique then?  Are the titles more to do with the glass the acid is applied to?  Do they just let it bite deeper on the darker colours, hence Scavo (dug up/excavated) giving the whitish areas?  I'm interested, I thought they were basically the same thing.  :x

Sorry...a lot of questions for first thing in the morning!  :lol:
I am not a man

Offline chuggy

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 826
  • Gender: Male
Signed Cenedese- Scavo?
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2006, 12:24:01 PM »
If I can stick my oar in and hopefully help out a bit.
Corroso is achieved by dipping into hydro-fluoric acid after being treated with a resin that is then chipped away when dry leaving just selected parts exposed to the acid whilst the remainder remains smooth. If you look back at the pictures of the Poli hippo (link below), this shows it well with the base area completely unaffected whilst the body of the hippo was corroso treated.

http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?album=94&pos=2

I'm not sure which acid is used in Scavo, but the effect is applied to the whole piece and not selectively and produces a very different effect visually.
Paul
There is no distance on earth as far away as yesterday.

Offline Max

  • Global Moderator
  • Members
  • *
  • Posts: 3473
  • Gender: Female
Signed Cenedese- Scavo?
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2006, 12:45:45 PM »
Thanks Paul!  That clears it up entirely for me.  Oooh, I've learned something today!  :D  :D  I'm trying desperately to commit it to memory now.   :roll:
I am not a man

 

Search
eBay.com
eBay.co.uk

Link to Glass Encyclopedia
Link to Glass Museum
Enter
key words
to search
Amazon.com
This Website is provided by Angela Bowey, PO Box 113, Paihia 0247, New Zealand