Author Topic: Who is this by please?  (Read 1239 times)

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Offline josordoni

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Who is this by please?
« on: June 15, 2006, 04:15:59 PM »
Could anyone cast some light on who this piece may be by?  My thoughts are obviously Salviati or Fratelli Toso, but I am far from sure on this.

(http://www.clarkagency.co.uk/pinkvenetianwhole.jpg)

http://www.clarkagency.co.uk/pinkvenetiantop.jpg

http://www.clarkagency.co.uk/pinkvenetiandolphin.jpg

http://www.clarkagency.co.uk/pinkvenetianbase.jpg

hope the pics aren't too big... :cry:


Offline chuggy

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Who is this by please?
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2006, 06:24:18 PM »
Must admit Lynne my money would be on Salviati.
Paul
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Offline josordoni

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Who is this by please?
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2006, 07:27:49 PM »
Certainly my thoughts, until I saw some on here

http://thomonthenet.com/?p=MuranoGlassConfectionsInGlass&t=s

half way down, Dolphin Three Swans and Hippograph candlestick, that look very like this one, and this says they are Fratelli Toso.....


Offline Ivo

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Who is this by please?
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2006, 08:03:08 PM »
There is no comparison to the old pieces you found attributed to Artisti Barovier or Flli Toso. What you have is much more recent (3rd or 4th quarter 20th ct not 1st!) and probably by Salviati. The dolphin stem is a classic in venetian glass and has been used by many if not most glass makers.
Ivo
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Offline josordoni

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Who is this by please?
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2006, 07:12:10 AM »
Oh shame  :lol:

Can you give me any pointers to telling older glass from the modern lookalikes?  For instance what is the giveaway for this that it is new not old?


Offline Ivo

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Who is this by please?
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2006, 07:55:39 AM »
Detail, definition and classical shape. Leaf through a copy of "Venetian Glass/ Confections in Glass 1855-1914"  - or the website you found, and you'll notice similarities in the featured items.
Washed out pink colours and large scalloped rims are not the language of the classical Venetian glass makers. Pink and gold combined is much more associated with the fashion in the 60s...
but as always,  it is glass, so anything is possible.
Also, your glass is not a "lookalike" but a fine example of style development and there is no reason to be disappointed.
Ivo
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all texts and pictures (c) Ivo Haanstra.


Offline josordoni

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Who is this by please?
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2006, 09:12:56 AM »
Thanks Ivo, it is just down to experience I guess, once you have handled the good stuff, you are not easily taken in by the later, less delicate items.  My problem is, of course, that I don't see enough of the very good stuff in the general auctions I buy at.  I need to get to the high class auctions and antique shops in town and get my eye in I think.

I buy to sell, so it is quite important that I get it at least ROUGHLY right in terms of age, I hate to advertise something as old that is not, and then have to remedy the situation when I am found to be wrong.  This piece I put on to ebay last night (to take advantage of the 10p listings...) so I will now revise the listing so that it reflects the correct age of this piece.

As you say, it is still lovely, so I will not be unhappy if I end up keeping it anyway!


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Who is this by please?
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2006, 09:29:30 AM »
Lynne -

Here is a link to a modern Murano company which is making similar items to your piece.  Their dolphin bases appear to be a more refined than yours but you can see similar styled pieces.

http://www.vetrerialafenice.com/link/cat.html

It will give you an idea of modern Murano made in the traditional styles.


Offline josordoni

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Who is this by please?
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2006, 09:51:41 AM »
Thanks Connie, I actually bought two La Fenice glasses in the same lot as this one, and they are totally different.  I know they are La Fenice, because one still has its clear plastic label to the base!  Nothing like good detective work... :D

Here is one:

(http://www.clarkagency.co.uk/fenice.jpg)
http://www.clarkagency.co.uk/fenicedolphin.jpg
http://www.clarkagency.co.uk/fenicebase.jpg


I was not going to make any mistake about these two - the feel of the cobalt glass is very modern, and the bases are very flat.  I think I was swayed by the base on the pink piece, it is deeply ponted, very conical, with a nice swirled (possibly fire polished?) pontil mark, and the edges are folded.  Now I haven't seen folded base edges on modern drinking glasses before, usually that is a good sign they are last century.  The glass of the pink piece is also much lighter and finer than the Fenice pieces

question for Frank - are these pics too big as they are?  They are straight from my website, where I keep them as large as possible for detail, but don't know if they are taking up too much bandwidth here?


Offline Frank

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Who is this by please?
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2006, 11:45:12 AM »
Comparing the two visually, I would suggest it is possibly two different workers in the same glassworks. There are distinct differences in execution but distinct similarities in detail techniques.
Frank A.
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