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Author Topic: Stuart "Waterford?" pattern water goblets  (Read 2035 times)

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: Stuart "Waterford?" pattern water goblets
« Reply #20 on: April 13, 2016, 08:07:32 AM »
Am sure I originally picked up on this name via the Miller's/McConnell book '20TH-CENTURY GLASS'  -  page 237.                 It forms part of an interesting eight page section solely on Stuart, from the late C19 up until approximately the late 1930's, and covers most of the better known types and patterns of glass, produced by this factory.
Andy McConnell speaks of ............"Kny's Waterford pattern...........derived from the C18 repetoire ..................etc."         I have in fact quoted, elsewhere when we were speaking of 'Waterford', the full caption accompanying his pictures, where he says that some pieces in this pattern are in fact signed by Kny.
Reading Andy McConnell's comments in Miller's, he comments that 'Waterford' was a cut pattern adopted by English cutters in the late C18  -  so perhaps it was something that Kny chose and gave his own variation of.                Apparently, despite the seemingly obvious connection, this pattern has nothing to do with Ireland.   

Nigel also refers to this cut design, in his 'ART DECO TO POST MODERNISM', where he writes ............."known locally as the 'Waterford Pattern' (page 11).

Would imagine this is one of the earlier names given to a cut design from Stuart, and although it appears to have remained in production until at least the early 1950's, I've no idea if it survived beyond that period.................    judging by the book references it's heyday looks to have been c. 1930  -  1950.

If you have a rummage through my contributions re Stuart/Waterford, you'll probably find where I quote, in full, McConnell's words from the book.

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Offline brucebanner

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Re: Stuart "Waterford?" pattern water goblets
« Reply #21 on: April 13, 2016, 10:10:08 AM »
Ok that makes sense with the timing of the pattern name, I could not see how Stuart would name a pattern after a competitor but Wayerford Crystal by the looks as a company did not take off until 1947 maybe as the Stuart pattern of the same name died out ?. I think unknowns should be given a pattern name would help collectors source matching sets.
Chris Parry

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: Stuart "Waterford?" pattern water goblets
« Reply #22 on: April 13, 2016, 05:09:07 PM »
I had meant to also say earlier today that.............      as we know, many of Stuart's cut designs do have names - some very well known - as can be seen from the Replacements.com site, although I've no idea if these names were provided by the factory, or had some other less official origin  -  there are just a very few on the Board's Glass Gallery C5 site, 

Whilst the pattern for this cut design seems to have originated in Eastern Europe, I don't know whether it was Ludwig Kny or someone else at the factory, who originated the 'Waterford' name for this particular cut design - nonetheless a very good and early example perhaps of success by word association, since Waterford Crystal had a reputation for fine cut flint glass from the late C18 until the 1890's.              As you say, the name was revived again around 1947.

Until recently it has been difficult to source images of this factory's pattern books, not that this necessarily would have provided names, but a daunting task, especially in view of the volume of different patterns produced.

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