Author Topic: Three Pears Bowl  (Read 2922 times)

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Offline Anne

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Re: Three Pears Bowl
« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2006, 06:59:47 AM »
*bumping up*  Bernard, did you ever find out more about the Three Pears bowl?


Offline pamela

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Re: Three Pears Bowl
« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2006, 08:30:36 PM »
Bernard, I love it at first sight today! Following your information it is very small? Can it be Jobling then? Yes I would say after I.ve read more on Jobling here lately  ;D
Pamela
Die Erfahrung lehrt, dass, wer auf irgendeinem Gebiet zu sammeln anfängt, eine Wandlung in seiner Seele anheben spürt. Er wird ein freudiger Mensch, den eine tiefere Teilnahme erfüllt, und ein offeneres Verständnis für die Dinge dieser Welt bewegt seine Seele.
Experience teaches that anyone who begins to collect in any field can feel a change in his soul. He becomes a joyful man filled with a deeper empathy, and a more open understanding moves his soul.
Alfred Lichtwark (1852-1914)


Offline Bernard C

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Re: Three Pears Bowl
« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2006, 03:28:39 PM »
pamela — No, it can't be Jobling, whose 1930s art glass is well known and fully recorded, including a few patterns that never went into production.

Quote from: Bernard C
I am wondering whether it only being found in pink is related to the use of both thick and thin glass for optical effect.    Many colours would just not work properly.

Eighteen months ago I was so close, but unwilling to make the final step to the explanation.   If you look at each pear's profile from the side, you will see that they are slightly flattened.   However, when you look at them from the front, they are mouth-wateringly real.   Why?   The answer is simply that a semi-opaque material like this pink glass gives the illusion of depth as it gets thicker.   This should be easy to quantify.   Suppose that this pink glass increases the real depth by 25%, then to produce a life-like sculpture, the mouldmaker has to reduce the depth of surface features on his moulding by 20% to compensate.   Each different type of glass will require its own particular compensation factor.

So my conclusion is that the decision to use this particular pink glass was included into the design process from the outset.    The mould was sculpted to work properly only with this glass.

Now, on to attribution.   I don't believe that British/German/Bohemian designers and mouldmakers ever appreciated this need for compensation in the depth of surface features.   To them, perfection was an exact miniature.    You see this particularly in the breasts of their lady centrepieces, already suffering from unsympathetic packaging to re-shape them, and, by the use of glass, apparently increased in size.

The Franckhauser Jobling jade lady has quite different breasts, which are reduced in depth like the pears in the bowl, and retain their natural shape.    The outcome is quite beautiful.

Information on French glass design and mouldmaking is difficult to find, indeed the only material I have found is that in Baker & Crowe.   All the Lalique references I consulted maintain a deafening silence on Etienne Franckhauser.   Yet it was the partnership of Lalique, the ideas man, and Franckhauser, the model or mould maker, that produced the amazing glass.    It is quite likely that Franckhauser had competitors in France working to a similar standard, either in-house or freelance (or both), so it is not really possible to attribute the three pears bowl specifically to him and his workshop.

Perhaps "Le Style Franckhauser" would be acceptable.

Acknowledgement:

Grateful thanks to Jeanette Hayhurst.   At a recent glass fair I bought a green Walsh/Douglas waterlily and iris bowl, the twin of BGbtW #114.   On p38 of Glass of the '20s & '30s, Jeanette describes a vase in the same range.   Her words got me thinking ......

Bernard C.  8)
Happy New Year to All Glass Makers, Historians, Dealers, and Collectors

Text and Images Copyright © 2004–15 Bernard Cavalot


Offline pamela

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Re: Three Pears Bowl
« Reply #13 on: December 31, 2006, 06:01:33 PM »
Bernard, the pears are important but I tried to investigate the basket also: obviously it's a 3 by 1 weave - which is not seen so very often... does this help historically? (I do not collect baskets I'm afraid  :( )
 :-X
Pamela
Die Erfahrung lehrt, dass, wer auf irgendeinem Gebiet zu sammeln anfängt, eine Wandlung in seiner Seele anheben spürt. Er wird ein freudiger Mensch, den eine tiefere Teilnahme erfüllt, und ein offeneres Verständnis für die Dinge dieser Welt bewegt seine Seele.
Experience teaches that anyone who begins to collect in any field can feel a change in his soul. He becomes a joyful man filled with a deeper empathy, and a more open understanding moves his soul.
Alfred Lichtwark (1852-1914)


Offline Bernard C

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Re: Three Pears Bowl
« Reply #14 on: January 01, 2007, 11:04:59 PM »
pamela — I had not even thought of the background as a basket.   To me it was a fence, mainly because around here dessert pears are usually grown as espaliers grafted on to a semi-dwarfing or dwarfing rootstock against a fence or wall.    Considered as a fence, the weave used is nothing particularly special.

Bernard C.  8)
Happy New Year to All Glass Makers, Historians, Dealers, and Collectors

Text and Images Copyright © 2004–15 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Greg.

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Re: Three Pears Bowl
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2016, 02:58:29 PM »
Recently encountered this bowl and whilst researching stumbled across this previous thread. Although the previous picture links are no longer active, the description sounds very much like the same piece.

The measurements and weight match the bowl of my example almost exactly. However my example does include a cover, with a relief moulded fruit design, consisting of strawberries, grapes, possibly cherries and apples.

Interestingly, unlike the other previous examples known in pink, this one is in green uranium glass.

If any further information has come to light since this thread was originally posted, I would be most interested.

Pictures attached....

Thanks,
Greg


Offline Greg.

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Re: Three Pears Bowl
« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2016, 03:02:08 PM »
Handful of additional pics....


Offline flying free

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Re: Three Pears Bowl
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2016, 03:23:59 PM »
Superb find Greg.  For what it's worth I believe the 'fence' design is the same as that seen on what are known as willow hurdles round here.
m


Offline Anne

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Re: Three Pears Bowl
« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2016, 07:20:54 PM »
Greg, see Simba / Angela's topic also: http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,49108.0.html


Offline Greg.

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Re: Three Pears Bowl
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2016, 11:25:32 PM »
Thanks M, they are a lovely, pleased to have found this one still with its cover.

Thanks for the link Anne, I will take a look, much appreciated.  :)

 



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