Author Topic: Czechoslavakian Chrysophase glass. AND Cellophane  (Read 4172 times)

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Sklounion

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Le Casson can you...
« Reply #10 on: December 13, 2004, 11:27:50 AM »
"How's your German, Marcus?"
Ivo,
Worse than my Czech or French, so will access the Czech versions.
Thanks for the pointer, seems an extremely interesting site.
Regards,
Marcus


Offline Ivo

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Le Casson can you...
« Reply #11 on: December 13, 2004, 03:03:24 PM »
For research purposes you should contact him, his database of CZ glassworks and publications is fabulous. As luck will have it most of the glass brochures are in German - the trade language of the time - not in czech.
Ivo
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Offline Frank

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Le Casson can you...
« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2006, 02:33:48 PM »
New information.

Harrachov glassworks introduced chrysoprase c 1827 a coloured glass that is a mixture of uranium glass with bone or alabaster glass.

Spelling of chrysoprase corrected here and in other threads.

Obviously much earlier than this threads subject! But it does show the term was used by Harrachov. If anyone has a piece of this glass can they check if it is Uranium glass?

(Source withheld as part of ongoing research)
Frank A.
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Offline krsilber

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Re: Czechoslavakian Chrysophase glass. AND Cellophane
« Reply #13 on: July 04, 2008, 03:27:31 AM »
I don't know whether this adds anything to this discussion or just confuses things, but according to Langhamer's The Legend of Bohemian Glass, "the 1830s brought the first glass colored with uranium oxide" and Harrach "made uranium glass containing some alabaster under the name 'chrysopras' (1831), and later perfected a uranium yellow glass."
Kristi


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Offline Ivo

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Re: Czechoslavakian Chrysophase glass. AND Cellophane
« Reply #14 on: July 04, 2008, 06:47:36 AM »
Correction, please. The first uranium glass dates from 1830 (not circa) and was made by Franz-Anton Riedel.

"Chrysopras(e)" is an opaque apple-green banded chalcedony.

What Langhamer refers to is in the range of imitation semi-precious stones which was pioneered by Harrach'sche, Egermann and Bucquoy -  but Chrysoprase was not perfected as a solid colour until 1843 when it was launched by Baccarat.

Uranium oxide as a colorant was used for imitation precious stones before it was developed for colouring glass.
Ivo
► BLUE HENRY ◄
 New Book: The Almost Forgotten Story of the Blue Glass Sputum Flask

all texts and pictures (c) Ivo Haanstra.


Offline Frank

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Re: Czechoslavakian Chrysophase glass. AND Cellophane
« Reply #15 on: July 04, 2008, 11:12:07 AM »
Thanks Ivo, I am fairly certain that the Chrysophase I seek was a product name used 1920s-50's or 60's latest and probably not uranium, just marvered and cased glass with aventurine found in apple green, pastel blue and pastel pink.

Somewhere there must be one with a complete label. But at least we have gotten a lot further in the last 4 years than in the last 20 of hunting.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
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