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Author Topic: Possible MDG , large , amber, square shaped bottle / carafe with long neck.....  (Read 1463 times)

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Offline Baked_Beans

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Yes you are right Christine , I will refrain from using the word !

I hope another similar bottle will be found with or without a leaning neck feature  ;D

Cheers, Mike
Mike

Offline chopin-liszt

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If you look at the rim flanges on both your new globe and on mine, you will see that they are both slim and well made, not a sign of apprentice work at all. The globes too, are of a very pleasing "right-ness" in balance and execution.
However, training of apprentices was definitely happening - I have always assumed that fine delicate features, along with some clumsy ones, might indicate an experienced maker and an apprentice working together.

It was the Boffos who taught the workers at Mdina how to make elegant slim flanges.
Pre-Boffo, there were button rims and thick cup-shaped ones, or none at all.
Cheers, Sue (M)

"Cherish those that seek the truth;
 Beware of them who find it."
Grimm.

Offline Lustrousstone

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The leaning neck will be probably something that happened during annealing rather than blowing or shaping

Offline Baked_Beans

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Thanks for your comments Sue & Christine,

I must say that the bottle is very well formed with an almost perfect circle to the top flange/rim... it's only the leaning which is a concern for me (if it's not a design feature ...which I strongly suspect it isn't )

The globe on the other hand has a definite , off-centre flange/rim which isn't a perfect circle and varies in thickness (unlike the rim of the bottle which is of a uniform thickness). The main body of the globe is very uniform and symmetrical in all respects though ...it's just the flange/rim  which lets the piece down. The decoration of the amber glass in both the bottle and the globe is very, very good.

I've added some more flash photos... as  the sun has retired for the night .
Mike

Offline chopin-liszt

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Wonkier than I had thought. ::)
But still, quite a good attempt at getting it flat and slim.  ;D
The sun up here retired for the rest of the year and beyond, some time ago.

Shaping a narrow neck and a wide slim flat flange is a complicated and difficult thing to learn to do with hot glass.

Does your bottle have any internal features that look like stretched applied foil on an internal surface?
My squat pot with the same trellis-like rather than mesh-like pattern does.
I am not going to call it zig-zag - that being the name of a scarce and desirable piece made by Mdina, and it will only cause serious confusion. Trellis-like for this pattern, please!
Cheers, Sue (M)

"Cherish those that seek the truth;
 Beware of them who find it."
Grimm.

Offline Baked_Beans

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Ha !

Yes , wonkey  ;D

The bottle looks like it was rolled in a powdery substance and then scored with a comb and then a much thicker rod before blowing into a square shaped mould ...very difficult to describe but certainly cased in amber as all the powdery substance is more  internal than external  it would seem .

Difficult to work out how this effect was achieved  ???
Mike

Offline Baked_Beans

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The bottle (and the vase ) could have been made by taking a gather of clear glass, rolling in a powder and then trailing clear glass on top in a 'trellis' pattern , rolling it again ......then casing in amber (quite a thick layer, hence the weight) then blowing into a square-shaped mold (for the bottle). But I don't know enough about glassblowing techniques unfortunately !

Cheers, Mike 
Mike

 

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