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Author Topic: Question on WHEN Davidson made this Primrose Pearline salts  (Read 1213 times)

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Offline mrvaselineglass

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Hello all
Can anyone shed light on WHEN Davidson made these Primrose Pearline salts? Also, if they belonged to a Suite, or had an Rd. date?  Neither one is marked.

http://www.vaselineglass.org/davidsonsaltpair.jpg


Offline mrvaselineglass

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Question on WHEN Davidson made this Primrose Pearline salts
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2006, 11:54:37 PM »
I did find the square one on the cloudglass.org site, top of page, 1911-1920 registered patterns.  Rd. 577153, registered jan. 28, 1911.  Now, just trying to find out information on the round version.


Offline Bernard C

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Question on WHEN Davidson made this Primrose Pearline salts
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2006, 09:57:11 AM »
Dave — Chris & Val Stewart put the end of production of Pearline at about 1914 in their recent book, Davidson Glass, a history.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright © 2004–14 Bernard Cavalot


Offline ChrisStewart

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Question on WHEN Davidson made this Primrose Pearline salts
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2006, 08:28:09 PM »
Hi Bernard & Dave

The phrase we use in the book is ‘it is likely that some items were still being made in Pearline until 1914’ There is no documentary evidence that Pearline was actually made as late as 1914. The last suite to be made extensively in Pearline was the 1904 suite. It is probable therefore that Pearline was being made for some time after 1904.

Some people have suggested that as a Davidson shell dish was known to be made in Pearline and also appears in the 1912 catalogue, this means that Pearline was made in 1912. The shell, a No 1 shell was first made in 1901 so this is not good dating evidence.

The round salt in the picture looks to be a number 131 salt and appeared in an 1893 advert (shown in Primrose Pearline). The square salt is not documented, but is likely to have been made at the same time – assuming of course it is a Davidson salt. These were not part of any suite nor were they registered designs. The ‘yearly’ suites and registered designs are described in our book ‘Davidson Glass a history’. We will be publishing a complete identification guide to Davidson glass later this year. This will include suites, domestic and industrial glassware.

Did you know that Davidson made nearly 200 different styles of salt and 85 different styles of shell dishes?

I would also love to know what a lump bottom, peg lower and an ‘open and shut tumbler’ were!!!


Regards

Chris
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Offline Anne

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Question on WHEN Davidson made this Primrose Pearline salts
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2006, 12:15:45 AM »
Quote from: "ChrisStewart"
I would also love to know what a lump bottom, peg lower and an ‘open and shut tumbler’ were!!!

Regards
Chris


Chris, I don't know if this helps at all but... there was a type of tankard called a peg tankard - apparently mentioned in some of Shakespeare's plays. I found a reference to it in a book on the Gutenberg Project website http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/3124

Quote
In the bibulous days of Shakespeare, the peg tankard, a species of wassail or wish-health bowl, was still in use. Introduced to restrain intemperance, it became a cause of it, as every drinker was obliged to drink down to the peg. We get our expression of taking a man "a peg lower," or taking him "down a peg," from this custom.


Offline mrvaselineglass

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Question on WHEN Davidson made this Primrose Pearline salts
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2006, 05:42:57 AM »
Chris
Regarding your dating and when uranium glass was made.  I have a photo of both a bright (non-primrose pearline) piece of No. 269 berry bowl (large, small and oval) and I also have a photo of Primrose Pearline in the No. 269 in a double marmalade frame.  These were registered in 1908.  Is that evidence that they made it past 1904?  Just wondering.  I can even share a photo of the primrose pearline!  
http://www.vaselineglass.org/davidsonraspberry1.jpg


Offline ChrisStewart

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Question on WHEN Davidson made this Primrose Pearline salts
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2006, 07:55:45 AM »
Hi,

Yes that is very interesting. I have never seen a 269 pattern in Pearline, straight uranium pieces are quite common. Do the dishes have the registered design number in the base?

These dishes certainly show that Primrose Pearline was made past 1908. We also know that in the years immediately after WW1, Davidson were not making any coloured glass. It was not until 1922/23 that colours such as purple, amber and green were reintroduced. This suggests an end date of Pearline of around 1914. There is no evidence that it was made post WW1. Which is a shame as could you imagine what a 10 inch 279 vase would look like in Pearline?

From the evidence we have unearthed in the Newcastle archives it looks as if Davidson were not making Uranium glass in the mid to late 1930s (we looked for what chemicals Davidson were buying and their production records), which suggests that manufacture of Uranium (as opposed to Pearline) ended sometime in the 1920s/ early 1930s. This could have been as a result of the depressed economic conditions. 20th century styles which often appear in uranium include the 269, 695 and the 279 vase.

Incidentally, in the 19th Century Davidson called their uranium glass Canary.

Anne, thank you for the info on the peg tankard. I will follow that up. Any thoughts on a lump bottom? Some of the early yearly suites include a lump bottom in their inventory, so it must be a piece of domestic glassware.

Regards

Chris
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Offline Frank

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Question on WHEN Davidson made this Primrose Pearline salts
« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2006, 07:57:43 AM »
Peg is also a term for a small drink. A peg glass is similar to a stirrup cup having no base. I should think the peg tankard was a leather drinking vessel with a wooden handle. The other terms mean nothing to me and I can't find any reference off line.
Frank A.
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Offline Glen

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Question on WHEN Davidson made this Primrose Pearline salts
« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2006, 09:15:15 AM »
Might the "open and shut" piece be something that was made by the "cut shut" method? I believe that "cut shut" is the American expression for the technique - perhaps "open and shut" was the UK name? Just a thought (probably wrong  :oops: )........

Glen

("Cut shut" method is where the item is pressed upside down and what we would call the bottom is left open. The item was removed from the mould and then reheated - the bottom was then tooled shut and the excess glass cut off.)
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