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Author Topic: Carnival query for Glen  (Read 960 times)

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Offline Pat

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Carnival query for Glen
« on: July 12, 2006, 04:06:49 PM »
Glen, I don't know how true this may be so I'm asking you. Someone told my friend that the more mould seams in a piece of carnival glass the less value it has. So she now is certain that it's worthless if it has several seams!

Pat
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Offline Glen

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Carnival query for Glen
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2006, 04:29:50 PM »
Hi Pat - no truth in that at all - tell her to stop worrying.

The mould seams are a feature of pressed glass (which Carnival is, of course). Pretty much all pressed glass has a mould seam or two (or three) on it. Most Carnival bowls, for example, have three mould seams, which can be seen on the exterior of the item.

There's always the exception to the rule - some items such as the Four Flowers Variant plates and bowls, and some of the Crown Crystal Australian items, have no mould seams, because they were made from one piece moulds. It's the exception rather than the norm, though.

There is absolutely no connection at all between the existence of mould seams and value. The things that affect value are scarcity / desirability of pattern, colour and shape - and of course condition as well as overall appearance.

Let's put her mind at rest - the Millersburg Peoples Vase, which recently topped $100,000 at auction, has mould seams. Several in fact  :lol:

Glen
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Offline Pat

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Carnival query for Glen
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2006, 07:30:01 PM »
Thank you very much.
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Connie

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Carnival query for Glen
« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2006, 09:20:17 PM »
Pat  - In general with American pressed glass the higher number of mould lines indicates a more expensive piece of glass.  The number of mould lines are often used to differentiate between the old original pieces and more modern remakes or reproductions, especially with Elegant Glass of the Depression Era.

2 examples that come to mind are Kings Crown made made Tiffin and then by Indiana. The Tiffin pieces were made on 3-part moulds and the Indiana pieces were made on 2-part moulds.

Also the mould numbers are a way to differentiate between Fostoria American and the cheaper remake Indiana Whitehall. The Fostoria pieces were made from moulds with more pieces than the Whitehall.

With that being said, with a quality made piece you would not expect the mould lines to be prominent.

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