Author Topic: Help with Latticino & Colored Ribbons Please  (Read 1465 times)

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Offline Jpthings

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Help with Latticino & Colored Ribbons Please
« on: July 18, 2006, 11:03:39 AM »
Hi,

I have this vase that have Latticino with gold trim Colored Ribbons. I Believe that this is Mid-century Murano art glass. I am looking to confirm this and wondering if there is a particular Murano artisan that might of made this. And would the gold trim be referred to as gold aventurine?  I also wonder why some refer to this as Zanfirico Latticino with Colored Ribbons. This piece is approximately 6.75 inches tall and while there is a rough pontil, on the outer edge of this there is a ground ring.

Thank your for any and all help
Bear :-)

http://img.inkfrog.com/pix/Jpthings/Ribv.jpg
http://img.inkfrog.com/pix/Jpthings/Ribvb.jpg
http://img.inkfrog.com/pix/Jpthings/Ribvc.jpg
http://img.inkfrog.com/pix/Jpthings/Ribvd.jpg
http://img.inkfrog.com/pix/Jpthings/Ribve.jpg


Offline chuggy

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Help with Latticino & Colored Ribbons Please
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2006, 09:35:51 PM »
Looks to me that it could well be Salviati from the late 1950's. Would be a good starting point for reseaching it.
Paul
There is no distance on earth as far away as yesterday.


Offline Jpthings

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Help with Latticino & Colored Ribbons Please
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2006, 01:44:34 AM »
Hi Paul,

Thanks for the boost, I will check it out.

Bear :-)


Offline svazzo

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Help with Latticino & Colored Ribbons Please
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2006, 03:56:50 AM »
Hi,
Thanks for your post...
Is the handle just clear?

Javier
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Offline Jpthings

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Help with Latticino & Colored Ribbons Please
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2006, 04:14:02 AM »
Hi,

Yes the handle is clear and applied. Does that make a difference?

Thank You
Bear :-)


Offline josordoni

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Zanfirico and Latticino - what difference?
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2006, 10:44:10 AM »
I was also wondering today about the difference between zanfirico and latticino - can anyone cast any light or are they the same, just different terms used?


Offline KevinH

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Help with Latticino & Colored Ribbons Please
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2006, 03:35:37 PM »
from Harold Newman's 1977 book, An Illustrated Dictionary of Glass
Quote
zanfirico (Italian). The present-day term used in Venice and Murano for vetro a retorti; the spelling used elsewhere in Italy is sanfirico.
Quote
vetro a retorti (Italian). Literally, glass with twists. A type of glass decorated with twisted threads of glass embedded in clear glass, ...
Quote
Latticino or latticinio ... Terms that have been often misused ... without regard to the Venetian usage of the terms. ... The two terms latticino and latticinio have been used in Venice and Murano to apply only to clear glass decorated with with embedded threads of glass ...usually white threads.
So from that, I deduce that zanfirico is simply (?) a modern term for the older latticino (or latticnio).

But, just for info, there is even more confusion on the use of those earlier Italian words when mixed with "filigree" (and "fiigrana" - for coloured threads), as often discussed by paperweight collectors! I have never heard "zanfirico" or "vetro a retorti" used in connection with paperweights but "latticino" (and latticinio) is used often. Filigree and filigrana are also regular terms used in a paperweight context for "grounds", "cushions" etc. made of latticino. In the sense of the definitions above, I suppose we could refer to paperweight usage of embedded white threads (latticino or filigree?) as "zanfirico", but thankfully, I don't think it has been done. :shock:
KevinH


Offline josordoni

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Help with Latticino & Colored Ribbons Please
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2006, 04:50:36 PM »
Thanks Kev! Looks like for the white lace like ribbons they are technically interchangeable, but used differently by the community.

I shall continue to use Latticino for white threads in paperweights then, and zanfirico for anything else!

I have also seen vases described as having ribbons AND zanfirico...  this had the twisted coloured ribbons as well as the thread lace like ribbons I would have called latticino.

So are the coloured ribbons zanfirico, or just ribbons?


Offline KevinH

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Help with Latticino & Colored Ribbons Please
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2006, 07:30:47 PM »
Quote
So are the coloured ribbons zanfirico, or just ribbons?
Oh, my, :D it's all so very simple :(  :?  :wink:  :cry: :shock:
Let's go back to Newman's "dictionary" and look at "filigrana" ...

Quote
filgrana or vetro filigranato (Italian). Literally, thread grained. A term that has been applied to glassware (with various styles of decoration) of clear glass, made originally at Murano, c. 1527-49, by the use of opaque white or of coloured glass threads (or even sometimes a single white thread), but which term is preferably used generally (as proposed by Astone Gasparetto, of Murano, in 1958, and other later writers) to refer to all styles of decoration on clear glass that are made with a pattern formed by embedded threads of glass, including (1) vetro a retorti (glass with embedded twisted threads forming various lace-like patterns), (2) vetro a reticello (glass with embedded criss-cross threads forming a regular fine network, usually with tiny air bubbles trapped between the crossed threads), and (3) vetro a filis (glass with embedded threads in a spiral or helix pattern, e.g. on plates, and sometimes in a spiral or volute pattern, e.g. on vases). This general usage of filigrana includes all three such patterns made with opaque white or with coloured threads, or both, and is favoured as relegating that oft abused word latticino (or latticinio) to designate only such decoration made exclusively with white threads. Thus used, it would also include glassware heretofore sometimes loosely designated as vetro di trina (lace-glass). ... [there's about as much text again "explaining" other stuff!]

Quote
filigree. the English term for filigrana. ...


See, easy isn't it? Yeah, right!
No wonder we get confused.
 :shock:  :shock:  :shock:
KevinH


 

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