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Author Topic: Help with Design Lozenge on Pressed Rummer  (Read 693 times)

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: Help with Design Lozenge on Rummer
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2016, 10:47:32 PM »
thanks Michael - big improvement. :)                    Sorry we've been unable to help with the first glass at the beginning of this thread.

Offline agincourt17

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    • Pressed glass 1840-1900
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Re: Help with Design Lozenge on Rummer
« Reply #11 on: December 21, 2016, 10:36:51 AM »
Paul - thank you for showing the design representation for RD 198277.

Michael - your photos quite clearly show the differences between your rummer with the 'anomolous' lozenge and James Derbyshire & Brother's RD 198277 goblet. The chief perpetrator of 'anomolous' lozenges at this period seems to have been Henry Greener, but Greener designs tend to have much fussier or extravagant decoration. I think it is quite interesting, though, that both pieces have several points of similarity - the shape of the stem and foot, and the broadly stylistic type of pattern on the bowl - but for the moment it would seem that the  "anomolous [8-2-4-1 / I]" rummer must continue to languish amongst the host of unattributed Victorian designs.

Fred

Offline Paul S.

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Re: Help with Design Lozenge on Rummer
« Reply #12 on: December 21, 2016, 11:08:54 AM »
perhaps I'm being a tad picky, but believe that the vast majority of 'rummers/goblets' that are discussed here are free blown and made in parts, as is standard practice with hand blown/made drinking glasses.
My opinion is that - for this thread - it could be of some benefit if the subject heading includes the word 'pressed'  -  just a thought. :)

As to whether we follow the wording of the factory drawing and call this pair goblets, as opposed to rummers, is debatable  -  but since it's true that the majority of rummer shapes will fit into .........  ovoid, ogee, bucket, cylinder and barrel, and possess a capstan or knopped stem  -  then this pair would probably not be described as rummers.           
Although there probably shouldn't be confusion, there can on occasions appear to be a lack of easy distinction between goblet and rummer shapes, and this is compounded by those many folk who refer to all largish cup shaped bowls as 'rummers'  ..........    these people probably don't have Tim Mills book  -  a very good read and worth every penny...........   a must if you have an interest in C19 rummers, whether pub/tavern or the posh end of the spectrum. ;) 

Fred -  unfortunately, believe you're right, and it seems we are still in the dark over this non-Rd. 198277 piece.            I've been through all of the National Archive pix I have for tumblers/rummers/goblets during the diamond period of 1842 - 1884, and I've not been able to find this single teardrop pattern  :)

 

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