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Author Topic: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands  (Read 5338 times)

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #110 on: February 26, 2018, 06:34:49 PM »
now that is one very attractive kit.         Unsure of your location Peter, but if you were within an hour or so travelling time from London, you might like to consider joining The National Archives  -  the records kept at Kew are staggering to put it mildly and am sure you'd find their resources of interest.

Offline peternam

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #111 on: February 27, 2018, 09:46:16 AM »
Paul

Thanks. I have spent many happy hours at Kew - a short journey for me

Peter

Offline Anne

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #112 on: March 01, 2018, 01:57:14 AM »
Hi Peter, welcome to the board.  It sounds like an interesting research project you are doing. I presume you have seen the entry on Charterhouse Buildings with an engraving of the aftermath of the fire here? http://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-london/vol46/pp385-406#h3-0005

You are correct that Chapman Son & Co appear to have made Dressing Cases. Oliver Chapman (1816-1880) was a cabinet maker by trade (1841 census), who is shown on all subsequent census up to and including 1871 as a dressing case manufacturer.   

In 1861 Oliver's older sister was listed as a jewel case liner, his son William O Chapman was a jeweller, son Oliver a surgical instruments maker.  Middleton was shown as a traveller in 1861 and by 1871 he was a dressing case manufacturer, by 1881 as a merchant of fancy goods he was employing 18 men, 7 women and 4 boys. There is no trace of him or his wife in the 1891 census, but in 1901 he was shown as a dressing case manufacturer and in 1911 a merchant dressing cases.

Another of Oliver's sons Frederick J Chapman is shown on the 1871 with him as a dressing case manufacturer, and a daughter Hannah E Chapman as a dressing case liner. Middleton living elsewhere in 1871 has living with him and his wife, his 16 year old brother in law, William J Noyes (1855-1924), a silversmith apprentice. Middleton's daughter married Thomas A Milo, who was manager to a manufacturer in 1901 and later a marble seller in 1911.

So, to my eyes it looks like many of the family may have worked within the business. The glass was either commissioned from a glassmaker or maybe they used standard designs, and added silver trim, lids etc....  which was not uncommon.

Having worked through all of the above, I then found the following information, which you may already have, but if not, it supplements the census info...

Grace's Guide: https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/M._Chapman,_Son_and_Co

M. Chapman, Son and Co
of 2 Charterhouse Buildings, Goswell Road, London, EC1. (1922)
("Chasoco") Ditto Address. Telephone: Clerkenwell 5868, Cables: "Tantalus-Barb, London". (1929)

1798 Company established.

1922 Listed Exhibitor - British Industries Fair. Manufacturers of Automatic Tables and Cabinets for Writing, Smoking, Liqueurs, Work, etc.; Dressing Cases, Leather Goods, Mounted Glass. (Stand No. E.25) [1] Ref. 1922 British Industries Fair p16

1929 British Industries Fair Advert for 'High-Class Fancy Cabinet Goods', and various folding tables. Surprise Spriit, Cocktail, Smoking, Writing, Tea Tables, Self-closing action. Tantalus Spirit Stands, Smokers' Cabinets. Writing Cabinets. Work Tables. Cigar and Cigarette Boxes. Chapman's Patent Lock Bottles. (Jewellery Section - Stand No. J.76) [2] Ref. 1929 British Industries Fair Advert 65; and p38

Image showing one of the dressing cases.... https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/File:Im1929BIF-Chapman.jpg

Silver Marks:
M.C was registered as a silver mark by M Chapman, Son & Co Ltd (Middleton Chapman)   1903..1919 (registered Feb 1892 & 1901, 1909, 1910)    https://www.silvermakersmarks.co.uk/Makers/London-MA-MC.html

Cabinet Maker:
"... in December 1900, Nat signed a five year indenture as an apprentice cabinet maker with M. Chapman, Son & Co., a ‘top of the range’, furniture manufacturer, who operated from premises at, 2 Charterhouse Buildings, Goswell Road, London, EC1."
https://www.78rpmcommunity.com/beta/78rpmcataloger/charles-nat-star-a-life-in-music/

Finally, going back to Henry Herbert as a publisher of handbooks etc, publishers were often stationers as well, and we have examples of stationers having glass inkwells registered in their name, again they would have commissioned a glassworks to make them for them.


Offline peternam

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #113 on: March 01, 2018, 07:16:06 AM »
Anne

Thank you for all your information.

And also: Middleton was involved in politics, becoming Mayor of Finsbury in 1903. Plus, he had an uncle and grandfather also called Middleton

Your most useful comment from my point of view is your last one, about Henry Herbert - this really helps to clarify what he probably did ie he was (possibly foremostly) a publisher, and a stationer - and had an interest in "fancy goods" (see my earlier post) which could have covered a multitude of things but seems to have included sub-contracting glass items (such as inkstands). And from other evidence that I have, Henry Herbert occupied 2 Charterhouse Buildings from 1872 (maybe  from 1869 when the building was first occupied). He was initially in partnership with a Mr Higgins but shortly on his own account). He was declared bankrupt in 1884.

Meanwhile Chapman Son & Co occupied Charterhouse Buildings from 1869 until at least 1891. And your evidence confirms that they made high class wooden cases (and supplied their contents - probably buying them in rather than making them)

Thank you

Peter

Offline Anne

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #114 on: March 01, 2018, 08:41:30 PM »
Peter, yes I think that Chapman's were primarily cabinet and furniture makers is quite clear.   They were clearly a company of note at the time.

Re Henry Herbert, it might be worth checking the Stationers Company archives to see if he was a member. It might give you some more info on him if he was. https://stationers.org/library-archives/archives.html

 

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