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Author Topic: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands  (Read 5277 times)

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Offline Anne

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #60 on: January 25, 2017, 04:01:44 AM »
Oops! Sorry folks, somehow the 2nd link had gone squiffy - I've had a word and it is now going to the correct destination. :)

Offline Paul S.

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #61 on: January 25, 2017, 09:59:13 AM »
thanks Anne :)

Fred  -  I also looked at the portrait and wondered if there had been an intention to represent Prince Albert, although probably never know now.
As always, very much appreciate your interesting contributions in the way of company histories and information.

Offline Paul S.

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #62 on: January 25, 2017, 05:11:44 PM »
Two more Registrations from Eliezer Edwards of B'ham, and one from W. B. Tate of London.            I've made the assumption that 197154 is an ink related item  -  it may not be of course - but couldn't really come up with a likely alternative purpose, so if people think I'm wrong in suggesting this is an ink well or stand then please shout.
Goes without saying that I have looked at Register BT 44/7 - which details Registrants names and addresses and some of the time provides a description of the item - but on this occasion the Register is silent on the intended use of Rd. 197154.             Neither can I see any words on the original factory drawing - hope I haven't missed anything.

Just had a thought  -  perhaps it's an ashtray ?

Offline agincourt17

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #63 on: January 25, 2017, 06:42:00 PM »
Thank you, Paul, for posting this latest batch of RDs.

I will add them to the GMB RD database this evening.

As for RD 197154, I'm afraid that TNA online summary too fails to give a description of the item.

Fred.


Offline Paul S.

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #64 on: January 25, 2017, 08:35:08 PM »
thanks Fred  ....               bearing in mind our new found knowledge regarding the sort of items that Messrs. Eliezer Edwards are known for having made, and combining this with the shape of 197154, then I think this adds weight to my thoughts that this also stands a good chance of being an ink related design.
I suppose though that it will always remain officially unconfirmed. :)

Offline Anne

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #65 on: January 26, 2017, 12:42:39 AM »
The only thing I think it could be in that shape, if not an ink well, might be a candle holder? (Sealing wax and all that!)

Offline Paul S.

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #66 on: February 05, 2017, 01:34:30 PM »
there is some way to go yet to complete the examples I have, so to prevent the moss from growing under our feet, here a few more for the archives  ;)

Two new companies amongst these I believe.             There is a comment on the drawing for Registration 215150 which reads  -  'There is no utility resulting from the shape of this design' - and don't think I really understand what is meant by this.      Something perhaps to do with a suggestion that the image is lacks proper 3D ??  -  am sure someone else will know the real meaning.

Obviously some of these designs aren't intended solely to contain ink, but I've worked along the lines that if the word 'ink' occurs, then I've made a point of including the item.

Offline agincourt17

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #67 on: February 06, 2017, 02:19:21 PM »
Thank you for showing theses latest design representations, Paul.

Some snippets re. beehive ink bottle RD 199959,  registered on 15 August 1866 - Parcel 8 by Joseph Perkins Teagle & Edward Martin (proprietor) of 3 John Street, Cornwall Road, Lambeth, London. Class 3: glass.

From a seach of the online registration summaries at TNA, this appears to be their sole design registration.

From:
http://www.bottledigging.org.uk/forum/Topic374008.aspx
Quote
The design was registered on August 15th 1866 by Joseph Teagle & Edwin Martin who were bottle manufacturers in London. They were declared bankrupts in 1868, so these inks can be dated quite accurately. Here's the announcement in The London Gazette :

"Joseph Perkins Teagle and Edwin Martin, formerly of No.3, John Street, Commercial Road, Lambeth, in the County of Surrey, Glass Bottle Manufacturers, and afterwards of the same place and of the Eclipse Glass Works, Artillery Street, Bermondsey, in the County of Surrey, Glass Bottle Manufacturers, and now of the Eclipse Glass Works, Artillery Street, Bermondsey aforesaid, Glass Bottle Manufacturers and Co-partners in Trade, having been adjudged bankrupts under a Petition for adjudication of Bankruptcy, filed in Her Majesty's Court of Bankruptcy in London, on the 21st day of May, 1868."


In the same link, the informant shows three pictures of  two transparent glass "side lying diamond registration barrel inks" (one in clear glass and one in pale blue glass) mbossed with a diamond registry date mark and supposedly from Teagle & Martin's RD 199959 but, to me, they have little resemblance to the 'beehive' design shown on the design representation. The details on the registry date marks are difficult to read , but they should read Q - 15 - 8 - R if correctly identified.

John Street was, apparently, renamed Johnson Street (postcode E1 0AQ), and has now been completely redeveloped.

Artillery Street, Bermondsey, is now Artillery Lane (postcode E1 7LS), which runs between Spitalfields and Bishopsgate. Although some redevelopment has taken place, there are still some fine examples of 18th and 19th century premises there.
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-london/vol27/pp226-236

There is record of a marriage of Joseph Perkins Teagle to Amelia Martin on 14 April 1861 at Spitalfields Christ Church, Stepney, London.  Was Amelia Martin related to Teagle's co-proprietor Edward Martin?

Fred.



Offline Paul S.

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #68 on: February 06, 2017, 03:25:23 PM »
thanks for bringing these pieces of history to life Fred  -  your additions with details of company information always appreciated.

four more items are now attached.

One...................  216632 - Molineaux Webb .........   As you'd expect, Neil has already investigated this one, although no image is included on his Molineaux Webb pressed glass site.            He comments that this Registration consists of two pieces and has a pressed star pattern - I think Neil is almost certainly correct regarding his suggestion that a stopper forms part of this design.     

Two...................  242642  -  Registered in the name of James Hickisson, although as you can see on the drawing it's described as "Bond's Ornamental Design for Crystal Palace Writing Ink Bottle" - perhaps Bond were big time ink well designers.          Although there's no mention of Hickisson on the drawing, I've checked the Register and Hickisson is shown as the Registrant.       
James Bond  (as you'll see on the next item) did in fact Registered designs in their own name - well, at least one design - so quite what the tie up with Hickisson was I don't presently know.               Why the design reference to Crystal Palace?  -  it might possibly be that the cross section profile of the design has some similarity to that of the original Crystal Palace?  -  will need to look further into that aspect.

Three .................... 243267  -  this appears to be James Bond Registering their own design - perhaps the shape was popular with clerical authorities, and just possible that the guttering below the roof was shaped appropriately in which a pen could be laid.              Whether this had a lid or stopper of any sort isn't very clear from the drawing.

Four ............. 288863 - I've no knowledge of John Short Downing of B'ham - they may well be makers in view of their location  -  the other three companies I'm sure were all London based.

Regret to say that I forgot to check before typing the above whether or not we already have any of these items on the Board's archive.



Offline agincourt17

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #69 on: February 06, 2017, 06:06:32 PM »
Thank you for this latest batch of design representations, Paul - the James Bond ' church' looks particularly interesting.

Snippets re. ink bottle RD 215150, registered by Edward Jackson Hollidge, Symond's Inn, Chancery Lane London, on 21 December 1867 - Parcel 6. Class 3; glass.

From a seach of the online registration summaries at TNA, this appears to be  his sole design registration (though there are certainly glass ink bottles, presumably unregistered designs,  bearing his name (see later).

Symond's Inn was one of the original 13 Inns of Court ( Lincoln's Inn; Temple; Gray's Inn; Furnival's Inn; Staple Inn; Sergeant's Inn; Clifford's Inn; Clement's Inn; New Inn; Lyon's Inn; Symond's Inn Barnard's Inn; Thavies Inn), a sizable number of buildings or precincts where barristers traditionally lodged, trained and carried on their profession.

Mr Vholes in Dickens' Bleak House has chambers in Symond’s Inn:
Quote
The name of Mr. Vholes, preceded by the legend Ground-Floor, is inscribed upon a door-post in Symond's Inn, Chancery Lane--a little, pale, wall-eyed, woebegone inn like a large dust-binn of two compartments and a sifter. It looks as if Symond were a sparing man in his way and constructed his inn of old building materials which took kindly to the dry rot and to dirt and all things decaying and dismal, and perpetuated Symond's memory with congenial shabbiness. Quartered in this dingy hatchment commemorative of Symond are the legal bearings of Mr. Vholes.


From:
http://www.victorianlondon.org/publications5/prisons-04.htm
Quote
The Inns of Court are themselves sufficiently peculiar to give a strong distinctive mark to the locality in which they exist; for here are seen broad open squares like huge court-yards, paved and treeless, and flanked with grubby mansions - as big and cheerless-looking as barracks - every one of them being destitute of doors, and having a string of names painted in stripes upon the door-posts, that reminds one of the lists displayed at an estate-agent's office and there is generally a chapel-like edifice called the "hall," that is devoted to feeding rather than praying, and where the lawyerlings "qualify" for the bar by eating so many dinners, and become at length - gastronomically - learned in the law. Then how peculiar are the tidy legal gardens attached to the principal Inns, with their close-shaven grass-plots looking as sleek and bright as so much green plush, and the clean-swept gravel walks thronged with children, and nursemaids, and law-students. How odd, too, are the desolate-looking legal alleys or courts adjoining these Inns, with nothing but a pump or a cane-bearing street-keeper to be seen in the midst of them, and occasionally at one corner, beside a crypt-like passage, a stray dark and dingy barber's shop, with its seedy display of powdered horsehair wigs of the same dirty-white hue as London snow. Who, moreover, has not noted the windows of the legal fruiterers and law stationers hereabouts, stuck over with small announcements of clerkships wanted, each penned, in the well-known formidable straight-up-and-down three-and-fourpenny hand, and beginning-with a "This-Indenture"-like flourish of German text - "The Writer Hereof" &c. Who, too, while threading his way through the monastic- like byways of such places, has not been startled to find himself suddenly light upon a small enclosure, comprising a tree or two, and a little circular pool, hardly bigger than a lawyer's inkstand, with a so-called fountain in the centre, squirting up the water in one long thick thread, as if it were the nozzle of a fire-engine.

[Over the centuries the number of active Inns of Court was reduced to the present four: Lincoln's Inn; Inner Temple; Middle Temple; Gray's Inn].

It would appear, therefore that the registrant for RD 215150 was probably working in some capacity in the legal profession, although whether he was acting on his own behalf or for a client is not clear.


Edward Jackson Hollidge was a Yorkshireman, born 1831 (christened 8 November 1831, Holy  Trinity, Hull); his father is Edward Hollidge (b. 16 March 1807, Cheshunt, Hertfordshire), and his mother's name is Ann. He died in the third quarter of 1891 in Hackney.

In the 1851 cenus, he is a merchant's clerk (aged 19, unmarried), living in Wright Street, Sculcoates, Yorkshire, with his father, Edward (head of household, aged 44, b. Chesham, Hertfordshire), Mary Elizabeth Masterman (Edward Snrs. daughter-in-law, aged 28) and 2 servants.

Edward Jackson Hollidge married Elizabeth Pinder on 18 May 1853 in Holy Trinty, Hull. Father of the groom - Edward Hollidge; father of the bride - Charles Pinder

Children: James Edward (M., chr. 3 April 1854, Holy Trinity, Hull); Charles (M., Chr. 18 August 1855, Holy Trinity, Hull); John (M., Chr. 29 October 1856, Holy Trinity, Hull); William (M., chr. 2 October 1857, Holy Trinity, Hull); Frederick (M., Chr. 28 April 1858, Holy Trinity, Hull); Mary Elizabeth (F., chr. 11 June 1861, St. Luke, Hull); Alice Maud (F., Chr. 30 June 1862, Hull); Arthur (M., b. about 1866 in Wakefield, Yorkshire).

In the 1871 census, he is aged 39, living in Hammersmith, London, with his wife, Elizabeth (aged 37, born in Horner?, Lincolnshire), and his son, James Edward (aged 17). Occupation - ink maker.

In the 1881 census, he is living in Canonbury Grove, Islington (head of household, aged 49), with his wife Elizabeth ( aged 47, described as being born in Horncastle, Lincolnshire) his sons, Edward, Frederick, and Arthur (Arthur aged 15, b. in Wakefield, Yorks.), and his father, Edward (aged 74, b. Cheshunt, Hertfordshire). Edward Jackson Hollidge is described as a 'silk manufacturer, employing 6 hands') - perhaps this is a mistranscription of 'ink manufacturer' ?. Quite a smart address.

In the 1891 census, (aged 59, b. Yorkshire). he was living at 34 Devonshire Road,  Hackney, with his wife, Elizabeth, (aged 57, b. Lincolnshire), his son, Arthur (aged 25, b. Yorkshire), and his father, Edward (84, b. Hertfordshire). He is described as an 'ink manufacturer'. Another smart address by the looks of the Victorian houses still surviving.

There is a death record for Edward Jackson Hollidge (aged 60) of Hackney in the 3rd quarter of 1891, and for Elizabeth Hollidge (aged 65) of Hackney in the first quarter of 1898.

Glass pen rest ink bottle marked 'Hollinge, London' on the shoulder at
http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/inkwell-pen-rest-hollidge-ink-bottle-105189804
quite similar to Hollidge's RD 215150 bottle. I gather that this shape is also known as a 'rectangular cabin' or 'boat'  ink

E.J. Hollidge Ltd  'Eureka Bright Blue Ink' branded stoneware ink bottle at
https://www.ebth.com/items/112501-eureka-vintage-inkwell

There is a Hollidge stoneware 'penny ink' bottle on the  bottom middle row of the section at
http://www.antiquebottles.co.za/pages/categories/Ink.htm

Stoneware ink bottle, including one with a label for
‘HOLLIDGE’S WRITTING FLUID // MANUFACTURED BY E.J. HOLLIDGE LTD // KING HENRY’S WALK, LONDON // ESTABLISHED 1861 (or 1851?)’ at
http://www.khwgarden.org.uk/about-the-garden/history/
King Henry's Walk, London is at postcode NI 4NX, and is less than a mile from Edward Jackson Hollidge's Canonbury Grove address (postcode N1 2HR) residential address of 1881.


Fred.

 

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