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Author Topic: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands  (Read 6568 times)

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Offline agincourt17

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #70 on: February 07, 2017, 02:44:46 PM »
Snippets re. 'clerical inkstand' RD 243267, registered by James Bond, proprietor, Works, 75 Southgate Road, London, on July 18 1870 - Parcel 4. Class 3: glass.

Oddly, the registrant's name details seem to have been erased from the design representation for some reason (I think the reason possibly being that 'Bond's' may have been acquired by James Hickisson - see below).

Notice dated May 26, 1852, from 'The Globe and Traveller':
Quote
CAUTION.—TO TRADESMEN,
MERCHANTS, SHIPPERS OUTFITTERS, &c.
Whereas; it has lately come to my knowledge that some unprincipled person or persons have for some time past been imposing upon the public by selling to the Trade and others a spurious article under the name of BOND'S PERMANENT MARKING INK: This is to give notice, that I am the Original and Sole Proprietor and Manufacturer of the said article, and do not employ any traveller, or authorise any person to represent themselves as coming from my Establishment for the purpose of selling the said Ink, This Caution is published by me to prevent further imposition upon the public, and serious injury to myself.
E. R. BOND, Sole Executrix and Widow of the late John Bond, 28, Long lane, West Smithfield, London.
See:
http://www.londonancestor.com/globe/adv-caution.htm

From the 'Great Britain Royal Commission for the Chicago Exhibition 1893 - British Section':
Quote
Bond, John (now J. Hickisson), 75 Southgate Road, London, N. Crystal Palace. John Bond's marking ink and appliances for marking linen, cotton, and other textiles, writing and copying inks of every description, rubber stamps and stencil plates, cement for mending china and glass, patent disinfecting pen, patent disinfecting inks.

A magazine advert published in 1896 for 'John Bond's Daughter's Rubber Stamps. Crystal Palace, John Bond's Daughter's Gold Medal Marking Ink Works'. See:
http://www.sensationpress.com/victorianrubberstamps.htm


From the British Journal of Nursing, August 30, 1913:
Quote
John Bond's " Crystal Palace " Marking Ink is a household word for excellence, and we there- fore assume this to be taken for granted, and direct our readers' attentcon fortliwitli to the cendy-introduced " John Bond's ' Crystal Palace ' Marking Ink Cabinet." This comprises a red leatherette hinged box, a square bottle of non- heat marking ink, a new perfected metallic marking pen and holder, and a linen stretcher- also a voucher entitling purchasers to their name or monogram. rubber stamp, with pad and brush, for 7:Id. The marking of linen, desirable in the case of private individuals, is essential in public institutions, to minimise mistakes, theft and loss. Private nurses also who are constantly moving from one case to another realise the necessity of having their linen legibly marked if they are not to lose many small articles in the wash. To them this compact and convenient little cabinet will be a veritable boon, and we unhesitatingly recommend it. The ink can be obtained in bottles for 6d. or IS., from all chemists, stationers, or stores, or direct on receipt of stamps from the manufactory, 75, Southgate Road, London, N. Bond's Marking Ink has now been on the market for a century, and during this period the proprietors have been honoured with Royal appoint ments, Government contracts, and gold medals from all parts of the world.

See:
http://rcnarchive.rcn.org.uk/data/VOLUME051-1913/page178-volume51-30thaugust1913.pdf

1929 advert for John Bond's marking ink
http://rcnarchive.rcn.org.uk/data/VOLUME077-1929/page309-volume77-november1929.pdf

A selection of adverts for Bond's Marking Ink from between 1859 and 1936 shown at:
http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/John_Bond

John Bond Crystal Palace Pen nib:
http://www.thepalimpsest.co.uk/2013/08/john-bond-crystal-palace-pen-nib.html

Explanation of Bond's use of the 'Crystal Palace' brand name, from:
http://www.studygroup.org.uk/Articles/Content/91/James%20Bond.htm

Quote
The Name is Bond, John Bond, Licensed to Quill.
by
Fred Peskett
The firework company C.T. Brock was well known in adopting the name “Crystal Palace” and the image of the building as their trade mark for many years. However, there was another company using both the name and image of the Crystal Palace, John Bond who manufactured Marking Inks to identify laundry. These were made from the early 1800’s right through to the 1950’s when it was the custom to mark linens with a name or some other identification prior to sending to the laundry or bag-wash. When John Bond, who had a factory in North London’s Balls Pond Road area first started using the “Crystal Palace” and image of the building as a trade mark is uncertain, the establishment of the firm was in 1806, and it has been suggested that they exhibited at the Great Exhibition in 1851 and later supplied their Marking Kits to the Crystal Palace Company from 1854, hence using the Palace connection as a trade mark was given as a favour.
The Marking Kits in the early 1800’s comprised a small bottle of permanent marking ink, a short quill pen, and a linen stretcher or writing tablet made in two wooden parts. A central disc with tapered sides and a matching annulus with the internal tapered diameter a little larger than that of the disc. The method was to place the piece of linen to be marked over the disc and press the annulus over the cloth and disc, thus providing a taut surface to write upon. From about 1890 to the 1950's the guill pen was replaced by a conventional steel nib pen.
The 1860's design of the Linen Stretcher/Writing Tablet was 2 5/8" diameter by 5/8" thick, the annulus is 2 7/8" diameter by 3/8" thick, a blue label covers the tablet and is marked “CRYSTAL PALACE” BOND’S CABINET. LINEN STRETCHER. 1/6. This design was changed in the early 1900’s to a 2 1/4" diameter by 1/2" thick disc with the annulus 2 3/8" diameter by 3/8" thick, now with printed labels in red, which range from light red to orange red, and from deep red to scarlet, all are now marked, JOHN BOND’S “CRYSTAL PALACE” WRITING TABLET, and have a view of the Palace and Terraces. There is a minor difference on some whereby the quotation marks of “CRYSTAL PALACE” are sometimes reversed.
These tablets were given free with the 1/- kit. There is also a “Presentation Linen Stretcher” which comes in two sizes of disc, 1 7/8" and 2 1/8" diameter with orange-red or deep red labels. The larger size has a view of the Crystal Palace without the Terrace in front. These were also given free with the enlarged 1/- kit. Finally the Linen Stretchers from the 1950's are made of tin-plate, 1 3/8" diameter by 3/8" thick with a metal circlip instead of the annulus and no longer having the “CRYSTAL PALACE” words or view.
The “Kit” and ink bottle packaging boxes also reflect the Crystal Palace trade mark and did so right up to early 1950’s. The John Bond “Crystal Palace” Marking Ink products make an unusual and cheap theme to collect in respect of Palace memorabilia, there are probably more variations yet to be found. There was of course another Bond associated with writing, Basildon Bond, however, he was a man of “Letters”.

It appears that, some time between 1859 and 23 June 1870, the 'John Bond' brand was acquired by J[ames] Hickisson and run by him as a proprietor from 75 Southgate Road, Islington, London, and because 'John Bond' and Hickisson are so intertwined I  will give more details about James Hickisson in a subsequent post.

75-84 Southgate Road still exists as a substantial block of large Victorian houses (some now converted) - postcode  N1 3JS.

Fred.


Offline agincourt17

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #71 on: February 07, 2017, 02:50:21 PM »
Snippets re. ' Bond's... Crystal Palace writing ink bottle' RD 242642, , registered by James Hickisson, proprietor, of 75 Southgate Road,  London on 23 June 1870 - Parcel 2. Class 3: glass. 

From my previous post, it is obvious that James Hickisson has the same design registration address as James Bond, and that Hickisson seems to have become the proprietor of John Bond / Bond of 75 Southgate Road, London, before 23 June 1870 (and retains the Bond company name).

The use of the Crystal Palace brand name by Bond is dealt with in my previous post.

In the London Gazette of 18 December 1877, Mrs. M.A. Hickisson, 75-84 Southgate Road, was exhibiting marking ink. She is presumably James Hickisson's wife.

75-84 Southgate Road still exists as a substantial block of large Victorian houses (some now converted) - postcode  N1 3JS.

1891 census: James Hickisson, ink maker, living at  Essex Road, Islington. Head of household (aged 64, b.about 1827 in London), married.

Roll of electors 1891 and 1892 -  James Hickisson living at 75 Southgate Road (dwelling house).

I can't find any death record or will details for James Hickisson so far.

Fred.

Offline Paul S.

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #72 on: February 07, 2017, 03:58:35 PM »
quote   .............    "The Name is Bond, John Bond, Licensed to Quill." ....        don't you just love it   ..... stunning punning..             
Marvellous stuff and very many thanks as always Fred for the time you put into these things  -  I will read and digest a little later.

Needless to say I have more, but will give you a break for a few days. :)

Offline Carolyn Preston

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #73 on: February 07, 2017, 04:32:01 PM »
Stunning being the operative word there!  ;D

Carolyn

Offline agincourt17

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #74 on: February 07, 2017, 05:19:16 PM »
Snippets re. glass inkstand RD 288863, registered by John Short Downing, Crown Works, 104 Irving Street, Birmingham, on 29 January 1875 - Parcel 2. Class 3: Glass.

According to TNA online summary of design registrations, John Short Downing also registered:

RD 282577 on 26 May 1874 - ornamental design for glass inkstand; Class 1: metal !!
RD 284581 on 25 August 1874 - Class 3: glass, but no description of item
RD 289799 on 8 March 1875 - inkstand
RD 290101 on 30 March 1875 - glass pen and tray
RD 290192 on 30 March 1875 - [glass] inkstand
RD 301266 on 15 June 1876 - [glass] inkstand; Crown Works address given as Commercial Road, Birmingham
RD 379826 on 24 April 1882 - [glass] pen tray; Commercial Road, Birmingham again.

It is thought that Irving Street was named after Washington Irving, the American author of `Rip Van Winkle', who had connections with Birmingham.

Irving Street (postcode now B1 1DH)  seems, until at least the early 20th century, to have run parallel to Holloway Head (now part of the B4127) for a long distance but now there's only a small part of the street left (even that completely redeveloped) , running from Bristol Street at the side of the Catholic Church.



John Short Downing, b. 1st qtr. 1846, Birmingham.

1851 census, at Hill Street, Birmingham: John Downing (5, b. 1846, Birmingham, scholar), is living with his father, Joseph (31, head of household), his mother, Caroline (31, b. Kidderminster), his sister, Rebecca (3), and his paternal aunt, Rose Bodgers (21, b. Bewdley).

1871 census, John Short Downing, MANUFACTURER, (aged 25, b. 1846)  is living in Edgbaston with his father, Joseph (aged 51), his mother, Caroline (aged 51), and his siblings, Mary H. (18), Sarah M. (16), Emily Caroline (13), Joseph H. (11), and William.

Marriage record for John Short Downing to Ellen Setten, 1st qtr 1871,  at St. Thomas, Devon.

1881 census, at Pershore Road, Edgbaston: John Short Downing, BRASS FOUNDER (EMPLOYING 100) , John Shorter Downing (35, head of household)), with his wife, Ellen (35, b. Exmouth, Devon)), his 5 children - John H. (7), Alice (5), Caroline(3), Ernest S. (2), and Marie (0) [all born in Birmingham] - his brother-in-law, Robert Setten (33, b. Exmouth, Devon), plus 2 female servants.

1891 census, at Raddle Barn Lane, Northfield, Kings Norton: John Short Downing, MANUFACTURER OF STATIONERY SUNDRIES, (45, head of household), with his wife, Ellen (45, born Devonshire), his 3 children - John H. (17), Ernest L. (12), and Marie (10), plus 3 servants (2 female + 1 male).

1901 census (31 March), at Sir Harry's Road, Edgbaston: John Short Downing, STATIONERS SUNDRIES MANUFTR. ,(55, head), with his wife Ellen (55, b. Exmouth), with 4 children - Alice (25), Caroline (23), Ernest S.? (22), and Marie (20) - plus 3 female servants.

I've not been able to find any information about the Crown Works at either Irving Street or Commercial Street so far.

Fred.

Offline Paul S.

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #75 on: February 08, 2017, 04:09:34 PM »
just to comment briefly on Fred's notes yesterday regarding the following.....................

""RD 282577 on 26 May 1874 - ornamental design for glass inkstand; Class 1: metal !!
   RD 284581 on 25 August 1874 - Class 3: glass, but no description of item
   RD 289799 on 8 March 1875 - inkstand
   RD 290101 on 30 March 1875 - glass pen and tray
   RD 290192 on 30 March 1875 - [glass] inkstand
   RD 301266 on 15 June 1876 - [glass] inkstand; Crown Works address given as Commercial Road, Birmingham
   RD 379826 on 24 April 1882 - [glass] pen tray; Commercial Road, Birmingham again."

Would appear from my records that I'm missing Regs. 282577 and 284581  -  so will need to visit Kew for these - hopefully some time quite soon.          I've looked at the Register, but this lacks any description for 284581, so may well turn out not to be ink related.
However, I do have pix of the subsequent five Regs. and will add these in the coming day or two as I reach these higher numbers.

I think Fred that your 290101 should read 290101 - at least the Kew picture does show a pen tray under this Rd. Nol., although not the pen itself, despite the comments in the Register of "glass pen and tray".        I haven't been aware of seeing any Registered designs for pens - at least not prior to c. 1900.           
Although technically a fountain pen of sorts was invented by Waterman, I think, some time in the early 1880s, most pens prior to WW I were eye droppers and dip pens, and quality was a bit hit and miss and a variety of methods of filling, and nib fitments, were tried before arriving at the designs we now know which were reliable.

Offline agincourt17

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #76 on: February 08, 2017, 04:51:33 PM »
Just to confirm that 'my' RD 290101 of 30 March 1875 should read RD 290191 of 30 March 1875 (glass pen and tray).

TNA reference BT 43/62/290191.

Fred.

Offline Paul S.

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #77 on: February 08, 2017, 05:10:26 PM »
thanks Fred.              When I started clicking my shutter at Kew some several years back, and in my keenness to photograph those items that I thought would be of interest to collectors and folk on the GMB, I obviously used too much discretion and omitted anything that didn't meet with my approval  .............  hence the few items that I now don't have in my own records.

Offline Paul S.

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #78 on: February 09, 2017, 09:42:06 PM »
and no - they haven't finished yet ;)

Couple more for John Short Downing, so your recent notes Fred will adequate for these further Regs. of theirs.                  Reg. 300519 for Charles Harris of B'ham can be found correctly in Jenny Thompson as her records are simply photos of the Kew archive Representation pages - poor and faint quality at times with some of the text unreadable as those folk who have Thompson's book will know, but nothing missing in the sequence sense.             
However, understandably in view of the poor legibility of this particular No. in the original Board of Trade Register (the volume that contains names and addresses etc. of all Registrants from the 'lozenge' period), Ray slack has mis-read the No. as 300619, and it appears as such in his book.       This would suggest that he appears to have used the Register only from which to extract his 'list', and possibly not looked at the design images in the Representations book.            I could be wrong  -  hope I'm not maligning you Ray. :)

I'm not entirely sure how the design for 300519 is intended to function  -  it appears there might be a lid, but not sure  -  and which part is supposed to be the pen rack is unclear.
Occurs to me that this outline shape is similar Eliezer Edwards Reg. 197154 which I listed some days back, which was also circular and the suggestion was made then of a possible candle holder - since there was nothing in either the Register of Representations book to say what its use might have been.        Since we know that the round 'lemon squeezer' shape of 300519 is an inky item, might this lend support to my thoughts that 197154 was also intended for the same purpose?? :)   

Offline agincourt17

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Re: Ink Wells, Ink Bottles and Stands
« Reply #79 on: February 09, 2017, 10:11:37 PM »
Thank you posting this latest batch of design representations, Paul.

I will try and add the John Short Downing RDs to the GMB RD database tomorrow, then try and research the other two over the weekend.

Fred.

 

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