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Author Topic: Webb Stemware Identification & Information  (Read 183 times)

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Offline nicky00

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Webb Stemware Identification & Information
« on: February 16, 2017, 04:59:53 PM »
Hi, 

I 'found' these two heavy cut signed Thomas Webb glasses and would dearly love to know a bit more about them if anyone can throw some light on the following..

1. Pattern name
2. Shape description and drinking purpose
3. Age

Height from foot to flared drinking rim edge is 13cms
Drinking rim diameter is 7.25cms
Foot diameter 6cms
Weight 303g ( quite base heavy feel.

The foot is a darker shade of baby blue. The feel of them in my humble inexperience  is that they are of a good quality.

The knob is not ball but ringed shape.

Hope that is enough info.  The pics are the best I can come up with for now.

Best Wishes
Nicky

Offline Paul S.

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Re: Webb Stemware Identification & Information
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2017, 06:59:24 PM »
hi  -  the blue sounds unusual, most often these things are simply clear lead glass  -  the lead content accounting for much of the weight, and it's
customary to call the little blob between bowl and foot, a 'knop', rather than a knob ;D - and the name on the foot is described as a backstamp, rather than signed.                   Glass can be signed, but it's rare and occurs only on expensive or very special pieces.
If you can photograph the backstamp, that's always a plus, but you'll need more than a phone camera, and the light needs to be angled to avoid glare etc.  -  plus you will almost certainly need to magnify the backstamp using some form of jewellers loupe or lens which will need to be placed between the glass and the camera.         It's not easy to produce good results, but practice will help you to improve :)

You don't say if you've tried the Replacements web site  -  always worth trying, although it's a mammoth encyclopedic source which can take ages to trawl through.                           I've had a quick look under Webb, Thomas  -  and it's just possible that your pattern is something they call WET 41 - discontinued apparently.       I've added the link for you, so have a look yourself and tell us what you think of this suggestion, although I may well be wrong  -  I often am.    As to type of glass, the first thing that came to mind was a sherry schooner, but other than that I'm not sure.                 http://www.replacements.com/webquote/BOCTHI.htm

Of course if you've already tried this site, then we may not get much further.

[Mod: The above link goes to a "Bohemia Crystal" item. Webb WET41 items can be seen in the followng link: http://www.replacements.com/webquote/wetwet41.htm ]

Offline Paul S.

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Re: Webb Stemware Identification & Information
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2017, 08:40:23 PM »
Hi Nicky  -  forgot to say that as these are T/Webb, then will probably be moved to British section, where you should get more views to help. :)

Offline nicky00

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Re: Webb Stemware Identification & Information
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2017, 02:48:23 PM »
Hi Paul,

Thank you so much for replying and with all that info...

Yes I had peeked at 'Replacements' and after your reassurance at that suggestion I will persevere.  I think it could be the WET-41 pattern but am not totally yet convinced for sure.

One thing I have managed to find is this ( along with a photo of my backstamp  taken as you suggested - well almost  ) is this same glass(s) found on legacyantiques web site. I'm going to claim in this instance that it could be prodo  of of my inherent taste  ;D
 http://legacyantiques.co.uk/thomas-webb-cut-lead-crystal-flower-vase-with-blue-foot.html 

I cant see why they think it is a vase as in my opinion the drinking rim is far to fine for it to be used for flowers and the shape is a little to flared for a posy vase.  Thats my logic and instinct.  I guess it cant be ruled out having said that especially thinking about the base weight.

Im never going to call it anything other than a knop in the future...Realising my mistake cause mixture of hilarity and a red face!!.

Yes lets hope it is move to the British section.

Im going to go back to replacements with a large cup of tea.

Thanks again

Best
Nicky

Offline Paul S.

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Re: Webb Stemware Identification & Information
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2017, 04:12:25 PM »
I think the size is a bit ambiguous, don't you - a tad on the big side for a schooner perhaps but not quite man enough for a vase  -  posy vase maybe  -  but having a knop tends to make us think of a drinking glass.
Does look like you found it on the Legacy site, and must admit I've not previously seen a piece of T/Webb with this blue shading, so maybe uncommon, and more desirable.
I suspect that all cut patterns had a factory design name originally, and my thoughts are that the reason these replacement sellers use rather boring acronyms or whatever is simply that they don't know the proper name  .............   really can't imagine T/Webb calling a design WET 41.
Congratulations on your picture of the backstamp - this particular example suggests made 1980 to 1990 - and goes to show the usefulness of posting these details..........   there are of course other formats of backstamp for earlier items from T.W., and the fact that we get to see them helps with dating.
Is that a lens intended for linen or philatelists? :)

I expect the Mods. will move your thread to British  -  but it's worth remembering that with pieces with such an obvious origin you will always do better to post in the correct section initially, to maximise exposure to folk who have an interest in British makers.    The main Glass section is for those items for which usually neither a maker or origin are known. :)

Offline KevinH

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Re: Webb Stemware Identification & Information
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2017, 05:10:31 PM »
Yes, Paul - the thread is in the process of moving ...

I have also inserted a "Mod" comment re the link you gave in Reply #1 as I suspect it was a slip of the fingers, or something similar. However, The WET41 deign has less vertical cuts than the one in legacyantiques link, which does seem to be a match.
KevinH

Offline Paul S.

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Re: Webb Stemware Identification & Information
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2017, 06:47:43 PM »
thanks for that Kevin  -  you're right, in fact my link was supposed to bring up the home page only for the Replacements.com - not anything specific.........  obviously the gremlins creeping in again. :)

Offline brucebanner

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Re: Webb Stemware Identification & Information
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2017, 07:39:25 PM »
Thats a modern Webbs mark i see on sometimes moulded whiskey glasses, stevens and Williams did the same blue, I have a lovely wine glass i found recently and after checking the base because of this post it has an early 20's S&W acid mark you can only just about see i'll put it on here, i think towards the end all the crystal makers tried cheaper alternatives including importing blanks to try an survive although these look really well made.

I would have thought a small bud vase for the op. 1980's
Chris Parry

 

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