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Author Topic: Need help Identifying this stunning compote please, and thank you.  (Read 650 times)

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Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Need help Identifying this stunning compote please, and thank you.
« Reply #30 on: March 01, 2018, 03:45:17 PM »
Aah. I got my description from Jo Marshall's "Glass Source" book. It's quite old and just a "general" sort of book. Possibly not the most accurate. :)
I just avoid the use of the term because it's not very useful and as it turns out, I still got it wrong despite being aware of it. ;D
Cheers, Sue (M)

"Cherish those that seek the truth;
 Beware of them who find it."
Grimm.

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Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: Need help Identifying this stunning compote please, and thank you.
« Reply #31 on: March 01, 2018, 04:03:11 PM »
Vaseline is just a US collector's term and can include transparent yellow glass with opalescence. It is all uranium glass be it yellow, green, blue, amber, pink, etc. in varying degrees of transparency or even opacity  The oldest terms are anagelb and anagrun and were devised by the German inventor of uranium glass. If you refer to it as uranium glass, you are not going to be wrong.

Everything thing in this album contains at least some uranium glass and has all passed through my hands, though some of it has left. http://lustrousstone.co.uk/cpg/thumbnails.php?album=1

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: Need help Identifying this stunning compote please, and thank you.
« Reply #32 on: March 04, 2018, 06:43:54 PM »
thank goodness that Reidel's wife's name wasn't something like Betty (rather than Ana)  -  would probably never have caught on ;)

Would be interesting to know the date that the word 'Vaseline' did first see the light of day, though suspect the source is now lost.
Christine (Lustrousstone) is our guru when it comes to u. glass :) - and Christine's linked collection is a very useful source material  -  I started to plough through looking specifically for 'vaseline', then realized there were 113 pages, so stopped.            There must be as many named varieties for colours/appearances of glass containing u. as there are days in the year  -  T/Webb's contribution alone is substantial.

I thought that Barry Skelcher's book 'The Big Book of Vaseline Glass' would be the answer if you wanted a definitive meaning as to the interpretation of vaseline, but how wrong can you be  -   neither in the preface, the intro., or the text (despite using the word once very vaguely), does it appear.              Almost as though he was avoiding it deliberately - so why the title then.            Well, it's obvious really - the publisher, Schiffer, is States based and, unlike the U.K., since the word carries such vast cache for collectors there, it was a must have word, together with values - which you sense Skelcher was really unhappy with providing.               The U.S. Dollar to Sterilng R/E was no doubt very different in 2002.
I don't think the word is any more or less confusing than the other five dozen adjectives used for glass containing u., I do seem to recall that the stuff in the pot did have the appearance of opalescence.          When I see or hear the word I'm reminded of the opalescent version of the Registered M.W. pike - looks just like the stuff in the pot, but I've not heard the pike described as vaseline.
There are some very well known trade marked designs/colours of glass from both sides of the pond, such as Burmese or Pearline, and we know immediately what is meant, but vaseline is open to interpretation by all of us, unfortunately, so perhaps best we say uranium glass and provide a picture, and Christine's suggestion of   -   "If you refer to it as uranium glass, you are not going to be wrong."  -  is more than useful.
By all means use the word, but we should remember as with all communications to qualify what we're saying  -  to quote some words from Cathy B. from back in 2005 (apologies Cathy)    "Crystal in Australia is usually high quality glass with lead content.   And people refer to watery milk glass as vaseline here as well.      It's wrong, but the convention is so strong it's hard to know what to do about it".   
So  -  anyone got a piece of vaseline milk glass to show ;) ;D

For a less than useful description of the word, and I'm surprised coming from someone like Raymond Notley, how about this from his 'Popular Glass of the 19th & 20th Centuries'  .............. "vaseline glass  -  an anachronistic name for acidically coloured green or yellow glass". :(


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