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Author Topic: Best example of Bullicante - Any Ideas who made it?  (Read 227 times)

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Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Best example of Bullicante - Any Ideas who made it?
« Reply #10 on: March 02, 2018, 04:57:22 PM »
Absence of age-related wear could simply be because of a careful owner.
I've stuck pads on the bottoms of new things to save them and signatures from me.
It doesn't mean anything if it's not there, it just helps if it is. :)

Is that rich deep ambery colour in the middle, really there or not?
Cheers, Sue (M)
"The really smart people know enough to know that there's too much that they don't know for them to be arrogant about the little they do know."
Prof. Ron Davis OMF

Offline ardy

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Re: Best example of Bullicante - Any Ideas who made it?
« Reply #11 on: March 02, 2018, 08:10:26 PM »
Hi Sue, Yes it is. I thought it was just a shadow effect but looking closer at it the inside is lined in a different colour. Being colour blind doesn't help!
Clean and Crisp a Murano twist.
Archimede tops my list.

Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Best example of Bullicante - Any Ideas who made it?
« Reply #12 on: March 02, 2018, 08:18:51 PM »
If you have trouble with reds, you're the same as my cat. ;D Cats only see in blue and yellow.
Do you know the pieces I'm referring to by John Orwar Lake? I've just had a search, their inner colour is often green though. Below is a link to one piece.
I didn't find anything with such complex bubbles with extras though.

https://www.etsy.com/listing/561892658/swedish-glass-bowl-designed-by-john
Cheers, Sue (M)
"The really smart people know enough to know that there's too much that they don't know for them to be arrogant about the little they do know."
Prof. Ron Davis OMF

Offline ardy

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Re: Best example of Bullicante - Any Ideas who made it?
« Reply #13 on: March 02, 2018, 09:00:20 PM »
BDG55, There has been a couple of discussions here regarding Sfumato v Polveri. My only take on this is that Polveri is dust and shows consistently across the work but it can have colour transitions in the work. Sfumato is more like smoke and the colour feathers into other colours in the work.

I have never seen this bowl of mine referred to as anything but Sfumato. See Leslie Pina - Archimede Seguso (a bit unreliable but just an example)

Still looking at the pieces regarded as Polveri I have, I find it hard to distinguish between them. This bowl does have a very different effect inside it to the bottom of it. The top breaks from a blue mottled, smoky effect feathering (sfumato) into a gold polveri. The base looks gold polveri all over. It is unusual and that is what attracted me to it.
Clean and Crisp a Murano twist.
Archimede tops my list.

Offline ardy

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Re: Best example of Bullicante - Any Ideas who made it?
« Reply #14 on: March 02, 2018, 09:03:01 PM »
Hi Sue, I had a look at his work and like you didn't find anything similar apart from shape but his work is excellent. Glass is like that, the more you look the more you want, with some exceptions due to personal taste.

I do not like 'tissy' pieces with lots of add-ons. I am more clean lines, superb execution. 1940's and 50's seem to be my take in glass. I have a weakness for art deco furniture and Japanese art and bronzes.

How the hell did a rough working class boy end up like this ????
Clean and Crisp a Murano twist.
Archimede tops my list.

Offline BDG55

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Re: Best example of Bullicante - Any Ideas who made it?
« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2018, 02:15:54 AM »
BDG55, There has been a couple of discussions here regarding Sfumato v Polveri. My only take on this is that Polveri is dust and shows consistently across the work but it can have colour transitions in the work. Sfumato is more like smoke and the colour feathers into other colours in the work.

I have never seen this bowl of mine referred to as anything but Sfumato. See Leslie Pina - Archimede Seguso (a bit unreliable but just an example)

Still looking at the pieces regarded as Polveri I have, I find it hard to distinguish between them. This bowl does have a very different effect inside it to the bottom of it. The top breaks from a blue mottled, smoky effect feathering (sfumato) into a gold polveri. The base looks gold polveri all over. It is unusual and that is what attracted me to it.

Hey Ardy...  There is much confusion about Sfumato as it relates to artwork and glass as the term has been used interchangeably with Polveri. 

Leonardo Devinci developed, and was the most notable practitioner, of the painting technique, "Sfumato".  He described it as, “without lines or borders, in the manner of smoke or beyond the picture plane.”   He didn't actually use smoke but used the word as a description for the hazy, diffused, and smokey appearance that resulted from the use of the technique. 

Polveri glass has a similar description but uses a different technique to the one Da Vinci used in his paintings: a gradual, defused appearance to the colors as they transition gradually into one another. 

Sfumato glass is acheived by exposing the hot glass to carbon, ash and smoke which gives it its distinctive dark gray color.  After the smoked portion is tooled into the desired shape,  it's then cased in crystal glass.

As for the use of the term, "Sfumato" in Pina's, "Lace and Stone", she later, in her book, "Art Glass Century 20", corrected her use of the term, "Sfumato" and replaced it with "Polveri", which translates to "powder". 

In her book, "Lace and Stone" page 69, Pina describes a particular pillow vase as Sfumato.  However, in her later book, "Art Glass Century 20", page 71, she describes the exact same vase as Polveri, which better fits the technique of using powders to achieve the "Polveri" appearance.

Anyway, that's my 2 cents worth. :)

Offline ardy

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Re: Best example of Bullicante - Any Ideas who made it?
« Reply #16 on: March 03, 2018, 03:49:31 AM »
Thanks BDG55, will have a look as I think there are descriptions of glass techniques somewhere on my hard drive.

Not sure about how your description relates to Murano glass. Still, you could well be right and I had a look at some of the Barbini pieces nothing like mine but an outside possibility as a maker.
Clean and Crisp a Murano twist.
Archimede tops my list.

Offline BDG55

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Re: Best example of Bullicante - Any Ideas who made it?
« Reply #17 on: March 03, 2018, 04:19:50 AM »
I don't understand what you mean by it's description doesn't....   Maybe if you tell me what you referring to, I can explain it better.

Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Best example of Bullicante - Any Ideas who made it?
« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2018, 02:05:08 PM »
 :) Ardy, your comment reminds me of a time I caught my OH gazing in awe at a large and striking lump of beautiful cased yellow and black glass in a posh gallery in Amsterdam, before he noticed I'd noticed him gazing.
When he did, he got flustered and growled; "I'm a man. I like curves."
Like you, he just likes what he likes and that's that. ;D
Cheers, Sue (M)
"The really smart people know enough to know that there's too much that they don't know for them to be arrogant about the little they do know."
Prof. Ron Davis OMF

Offline ardy

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Re: Best example of Bullicante - Any Ideas who made it?
« Reply #19 on: March 03, 2018, 10:26:33 PM »
BDG55, had a good look around the web and I can see where your descriptions are coming from. Did a translation of Sfumato and it came up with this one from Oxford dictionary:

Art

    The technique of allowing tones and colours to shade gradually into one another, producing softened outlines or hazy forms.

Origin

Mid 19th century: Italian, literally ‘shaded off’, past participle of sfumare.

On this basis, it can be what you want it to be ie smoke; and what I want it to be, colours shading into one another.

In the case of my large bowl it is both sfumato, due to the colours blending into one another on top, and polveri on the base.

The bullicante bowl - I ain't sure of.

Where the hell is Svazzo when you need him?

Clean and Crisp a Murano twist.
Archimede tops my list.

 

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