Author Topic: Help me Identify This TEXTURED Tree Trunk Vase  (Read 5253 times)

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Offline svazzo

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Help me Identify This TEXTURED Tree Trunk Vase
« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2005, 07:44:45 PM »
Thanks everybody for the comments!
I guess like Terry from Iowa said  "...the mystery deepens."

On the "sandblasted" comment....
I think it would be extremely difficult to sandblast the piece while it is cooling without it changing the shape, or having pieces of sand be inbeded inside.
I would tend to agree with Adam, that if the piece was sandblasted, it was the mold itself, not the piece.

Going in a different direction with this...
I had mentioned the texture as "machine made" at first, and I still think this could be the case.... Does anyone know if Glass itself was worked in the same way that enamels and metal were etched for decoration? I know i have seen in the Antiques Road Show (US and UK) pieces of enamel, silver, gold, and metal-work finely etched, both manually and by machine. Mostly done for background decoration on enamels and clock faces....

Could this have been done to the mold of my vase?
I dont know how well the Glass industry and the Metal-work industries worked with each other during the turn of the century (1800-1950), so Im putting it out there.

Javier
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Offline paradisetrader

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Help me Identify This TEXTURED Tree Trunk Vase
« Reply #11 on: January 12, 2005, 09:45:56 PM »
Javier
Are the white areas flash bounce or is it actually smoother on ridges and protrusions ?

Making the mold must have been something of an art form in itself !

A thought - an actual piece of material severely rouched within a basic form to make an initial wax mold - then a metal mold by lost wax.  These very very very  fine lines were in the weave of the material ?

Still doesnt explain the roughness I dont think ...or does it ? If the wax penetrated the weave to such and extent then tiny ridges ?.
....hmmmm
or would such minute detail be lost along with the wax ?
er am I going anywhere with this ? Help !
Pete


Offline svazzo

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Help me Identify This TEXTURED Tree Trunk Vase
« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2005, 12:11:47 AM »
Hello Peter,
I really do not know myself if a wax casting could have such fine detail in order to then be produced into a metal mold. Maybe someone else can answer that for us.  

On the ridges, it is smoother on the high ridges, or better said, the long collumns of the vase, but only towards the middle of the vase.
That made me think that it is actually older, and was smoothed down from handling. Either that or it was smoothed out by the maker for a greater contrast to the piece. You can see that better on the 3rd photo I posted of the vase. The large detail is from the top of the vase, and any white in that is glare.

Javier
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Anonymous

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Help me Identify This TEXTURED Tree Trunk Vase
« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2005, 10:42:21 PM »
Moulds are (typically) cast iron.  After machining, any finish one likes can be imposed on them by a man with a suitable set of hand tools and the necessary skills!!

Adam D.


Offline svazzo

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Help me Identify This TEXTURED Tree Trunk Vase
« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2005, 08:15:14 PM »
Thank you Adam for that information!

In your opinion, it is more likely the mold was sandblasted like you stated before, or that is was etched by hand?

Javier
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Offline Adam

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Help me Identify This TEXTURED Tree Trunk Vase
« Reply #15 on: January 14, 2005, 10:24:01 PM »
Javier - Let's be clear about this - I'm not a mould maker although I have seen a lot made and have of course been involved in their usage.  There is no doubt at all that the texture shown is on the mould and is nothing to do with the glassmaking itself.

Having said that, how the texture was done is purely an engineering problem.

My first reaction was sandblasting as you know but there must be all sorts of other ways it could have been done.  Shot peening (a bit like sandblasting but using metal particles), wire brushing and acid treatment all come to mind.  Nowadays lasers would probably come into it somewhere.

Anyway, as glass people are we not getting too deeply into engineering production methods?  Perhaps a metal-working message board might help if anyone were that keen to get a definitive answer?

Good luck if anyone takes that route!

Adam D.  (hopefully not Guest)


Offline svazzo

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Help me Identify This TEXTURED Tree Trunk Vase
« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2005, 12:28:06 AM »
Hello Adam,
I was just asking for your opinion, since it was mentioned you would be best to answer the question.
Sorry if the talk has gone more towards the technical side of things. Thought it would be helpful, at least for me to understand where this vase came from. Maybe that would bring in some other opinions as to the maker or age, since so far we are all stumped.

Javier
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Offline Glen

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Help me Identify This TEXTURED Tree Trunk Vase
« Reply #17 on: January 15, 2005, 10:40:10 AM »
Maybe my experience with Fenton may add a little information. Maybe not. Apologies if my contribution below is of no interest.

Anyhow, a few years back Fenton made both a mould and a plunger for my two designs (for the WWWCGA - an international, internet Carnival Glass Club). When we got to the mould for the exterior pattern, we were specifically looking to get an effect similar to the beautiful stippling seen on some old Carnival pieces (it really enhances the iridescent effect). Fenton didn't actually have the right kit to do that - so one of their mould makers (Alan VanDyke) custom built a stipple punch for my design, so that it would give just the right effect.

If you're interested in seeing some photos etc about it all, you can see them here.
http://www.carnivalglass.org/pine/making.htm
The pattern with the stippling in is the Flowers of the World (exterior).

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
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Offline Adam

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Help me Identify This TEXTURED Tree Trunk Vase
« Reply #18 on: January 15, 2005, 11:24:51 AM »
Javier - No need whatever for apologies.  The technical side is where I (normally) thrive!  Perhaps I was simply dodging the straight answer re how the stippling was done, which was "I don't know, but there must be plenty of real engineers out there who do".

Please keep the technical queries coming.  Hopefully I can answer a lot of them!

Regards,

Adam D.


Connie

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Help me Identify This TEXTURED Tree Trunk Vase
« Reply #19 on: January 15, 2005, 02:59:53 PM »
This piece has really been bothering me  :wink:  I love a good mystery.

What about the possibility of it being double mould blown? The same technique used to make optic pattern pieces.  The piece is first blown into a spot mould to give the optic effect.  Then the piece is placed in a shape mould to achieve the desired finished shape.

The only problem with this theory is that I can't determine which came first the striations or the big bubbles or lumps  :?

I can envision a stippled mould  first that when blown out further would form striations but the striations look too uniform.  I would expect more distortion along the length of the lines in the low versus high areas.

 

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