Looking for Glass on ebay? Angela's Designer Searches can help! Click here!

Author Topic: An unusual Davidson piece, and a mystery uranium stem  (Read 2658 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ChrisStewart

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 241
    • http://www.cloudglass.com
An unusual Davidson piece, and a mystery uranium stem
« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2006, 09:28:24 PM »
Hi,

What are the sizes of your shells? Davidson made over 80 different styles of shells, very few of which are illustrated in the available Davidson catalogues. The first was introduced in 1900 (called Shell No. 1) and made in 4 sizes (4.5, 5.5, 6.5 and 11.5 inches). It was still being made in the 1960s - in fact in 1964 it was remade in slag glass.

Regards

Chris
from Chris Stewart

http://www.cloudglass.com - The Cloud Glass Reference Site
http://www.davidson-glass.com - Information on Davidson Glass

All images (c) Chris and Val Stewart unless otherwise stated


Offline mrvaselineglass

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 514
    • http://www.vaselineglass.org
An unusual Davidson piece, and a mystery uranium stem
« Reply #11 on: August 12, 2006, 12:12:40 AM »
Chris
The blue shell is 4.5 inches long and 3.5" wide.  the Primrose pearline version I have is 5.5" long and 4" wide, so the blue one fits nicely inside the Primrose version.


Offline ChrisStewart

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 241
    • http://www.cloudglass.com
An unusual Davidson piece, and a mystery uranium stem
« Reply #12 on: August 12, 2006, 06:23:27 AM »
Hi again,

looks like your shells are the No. 1 shell. Of all the shells Davidson made these seem to be the most common.

Regards

Chris
from Chris Stewart

http://www.cloudglass.com - The Cloud Glass Reference Site
http://www.davidson-glass.com - Information on Davidson Glass

All images (c) Chris and Val Stewart unless otherwise stated


Offline Adam

  • Glass Professional
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 355
  • Sowerby 1949-56, Davidson 1956-61, Jobling 1961-72
An unusual Davidson piece, and a mystery uranium stem
« Reply #13 on: August 12, 2006, 10:03:22 AM »
Chris - was there a known gap in shell production post-WW2?  Unless I'm getting even more senile than I thought, I never saw any of these made (1956-61 as you know).  There were a few oddball unmelted jobs made in small quantities which I will have forgotten but the samples illustrated certainly look melted and I doubt if I would have forgotten those.

Perhaps they were withdrawn in the Tom Barton retrenching era and re-introduced by Abrahams, unless they didn't reappear after WW2 until after I'd gone.

Or is it just me?

Adam D.


Offline ChrisStewart

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 241
    • http://www.cloudglass.com
An unusual Davidson piece, and a mystery uranium stem
« Reply #14 on: August 12, 2006, 02:53:12 PM »
Hi Adam,

A Davidson price list of 1954 lists 4 shells, No. 1 (two sizes), No. 2, No. 13 and 1911. Their 1961 catalogue does not include any shells, so I think by then Davidson had stopped making them.

Davidson must have re-introduced the No. 1 shell in 1964 purely for their Marble glass range. They seemed to have made quite a varied mixture of items in this range.

Regards

Chris
from Chris Stewart

http://www.cloudglass.com - The Cloud Glass Reference Site
http://www.davidson-glass.com - Information on Davidson Glass

All images (c) Chris and Val Stewart unless otherwise stated


Offline mrvaselineglass

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 514
    • http://www.vaselineglass.org
An unusual Davidson piece, and a mystery uranium stem
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2006, 09:29:41 PM »
Chris
Yes, these are the two sizes of "No. 1" shells.  However, I truly suspect that the blue Pearline, and especially the Primrose Pearline, are about as rare as it gets in regards to colors made in the shell patterns.  When I bought the Primrose Pearline 2 years ago at the Glass Faire, I showed it to several very knowledgeable dealers and all of them suggested it was an American-made piece.  I even showed it to Raymond Slack, and he did not recognize it.  His partner said she thought it was Davidson, but was not certain.  If a room with 110 "cream of the crop" dealers from the heart of England don't recognize it as Davidson, I guess I would question your remark of "all the shells Davidson made these seem to be the most common."  The shells might be common, but the colors are not.  I suspected that blue pearline was made, but until I actually saw these for sale, I had no proof that they existed, and I consider myself fairly knowledgable on Davidson's glass that was made in blue or primrose pearline.


Offline Bernard C

  • Committee
  • Members
  • *
  • Posts: 3218
  • Milton Keynes based British glass dealer
An unusual Davidson piece, and a mystery uranium stem
« Reply #16 on: August 13, 2006, 07:20:52 AM »
Quote from: "mrvaselineglass"
... If a room with 110 "cream of the crop" dealers from the heart of England don't recognize it ...

Dave — On some occasions 110 dealers can be 110 times as confusing as just one dealer!   You may be surprised to know that the most inflential person in the way I look at British glass today is perhaps Dr. Rosa Barovier, and it took me a long time to really appreciate her advice, given to me at a short meeting in Venice nearly three years ago.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright © 2004–14 Bernard Cavalot


Offline ChrisStewart

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 241
    • http://www.cloudglass.com
An unusual Davidson piece, and a mystery uranium stem
« Reply #17 on: August 13, 2006, 09:30:22 AM »
Quote from: "mrvaselineglass"
I guess I would question your remark of "all the shells Davidson made these seem to be the most common."  The shells might be common, but the colors are not.


I agree that the pearline colours are as rare as hen's teeth, but when looking at total production, then the No.1 shell is the most common of all the Davidson shells. When looking at all shell dishes the most common one found in the UK is probably the Jobling pyrex one.

Quote from: "mrvaselineglass"
If a room with 110 "cream of the crop" dealers from the heart of England don't recognize it as Davidson


It was not that many years ago that most dealers thought all cloud glass was Davidson. New information is coming to light all of the time. When researching our Davidson book we came across a lot of new information and were able to show that some 'facts' about Davidson were wrong and resulted from mis-interpretation of records.

I think the thing that has had the most affect on our knowledge of glass has to be Pressglas korrespondenz. The large number of catalogues available from Siegmar has opened a new window on the glass world. For Davidson collectors two things come to mind from reading these catalogues. Firstly the Streit glassworks made a pattern that is identical to the Davidson Daisy pattern and secondly that Fenner made a pattern identical to Davidson’s 1897 suite (RD 285342) and some pieces were made in Primrose Pearline. There are many  other examples of similar patterns.

Chris
from Chris Stewart

http://www.cloudglass.com - The Cloud Glass Reference Site
http://www.davidson-glass.com - Information on Davidson Glass

All images (c) Chris and Val Stewart unless otherwise stated


 

Search
eBay.com
eBay.co.uk

Link to Glass Encyclopedia
Link to Glass Museum
Enter
key words
to search
Amazon.com