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Author Topic: Sowerby Pattern No 1159 and Lozenge detail  (Read 102 times)

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Offline Dubarry

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Sowerby Pattern No 1159 and Lozenge detail
« on: January 28, 2019, 06:58:45 AM »
I am interested in the way lozenges are formed and if some of the information is inserted by hand e.g. as in the "letterpress form of printing" putting individual letters into a frame. 

My curiosity was aroused when looking at a lozenge I have on a small Sowerby Trough Vase which on Yobunny (Sowerby) is named as pattern #1159 with a lozenge dating it to 20th June 1876.  At the bottom of the diamond is the letter M which is correct for this date.

The photograph I have included of my vase shows the bottom lozenge letter as a "W" or to me, an upside down "M" and this, then dates the trough as March 1878 which is incorrect!  If these numbers on lozenges are inserted by hand, I am curious as to how many lozenges could be wrongly set and give us headaches when trying to decipher them!

Would any member know how lozenges are formed?

Many thanks in the hope someone may have knowledge of lozenge formation!

Kind regards
Barry

Offline Anne

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Re: Sowerby Pattern No 1159 and Lozenge detail
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2019, 02:54:53 AM »
Hah! This is an interesting question Barry. :)

If you pop into the search function the words lozenge error you will turn up a number of posts flagging up lozenges which seem to be wrong somehow.  Just some examples so you can see what I mean...
https://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,50579.msg286077.html#msg286077
https://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,55007.msg312068.html#msg312068
https://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,59234.msg335072.html#msg335072
https://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,50579.msg286153.html#msg286153

My guess, and it is only a guess but based on my previous experience of setting type, is that single character punches were used to create the details in the lozenge when the mould was made. As these are (like typesetting) done in reverse, it's not hard to see how some of them end up back to front, upside down, or even in the wrong section of the lozenge.  I think I'm probably more surprised at how often they didn't get it wrong rather than how often they did, especially given that for these early designs there were still people with poor reading ability.  Anyhow, that's my theory...  someone else may know for sure though. :)

Offline Dubarry

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Re: Sowerby Pattern No 1159 and Lozenge detail
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2019, 03:50:23 AM »
Thanks Anne! 

Fascinating, isn't it.  I agree, and sometimes I have seen typesetters use incorrect letters e.g. d for a P or M for a W because they have run out of "characters" in the font they are using so this is why the font is built up of more "e"s or "a"s etc. as these are the most common letters and more are used. (It does look shocking though!)  I am a letterpress printer and have used hand set type, but these days a photo polymer plate is used and you never run out of characters!  Letterpress printing, a bygone trade!  Living in the 21st century!  I will read the examples you have forwarded.

Kind regards
Barry

 

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