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Author Topic: Controlled bubbles.  (Read 231 times)

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Offline Anne Tique

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Controlled bubbles.
« on: March 09, 2019, 11:22:25 AM »
Hello,

Something that baffles me and I was wondering if anybody could help me out please.

I bought this VSL vase recently and it has the little round acid mark on the bottom for the period 1926-1939.  This type of glass, blown and decorated with murrines, canes or bubbles was reintroduced at VSL in 1937, so i can date it 1937-1939.

In the early 40's VSL came out with a series of vases and bowls in pastel colours or just clear, uncoloured glass also with controlled bubbles. The difference between this vase and the production of 5 years later is big. Here the bubbles are not perfect in formation and slightly stretched here and there in the process. The 40's productions are perfect, the bubbles are nearly arranged and increase is size as they go up.     

Another big difference, leading up to my question, is that the bubbles can be felt on the inside  of the vase. They're not open or exposed, they're just covered with a thin layer, whereas with the 40's items, the bubbles find themselves perfectly in the middle.

For me this piece is from a experimental period, they needed to work on their technique and quality as the difference is big between both productions.


Finally my question .drum roll ..... how did they get on the inside?   ??? I always thought this type of decor was applied from the outside.

Thanks for your thoughts.

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Offline glassobsessed

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Re: Controlled bubbles.
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2019, 06:28:41 PM »
They were applied to what was once the outside, then it was covered it in a thick layer of glass. I would assume the bubbles can be felt on the inside because they were made in such a thin layer to start with.

John

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Offline Anne Tique

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Re: Controlled bubbles.
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2019, 02:22:41 PM »
Of course it is, you're absolutely right  :-[ I don't know why I didn't think of that myself. Thank you John.

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Offline glassobsessed

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Re: Controlled bubbles.
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2019, 08:22:21 AM »
I know that feeling! There are many techniques in glass making that seem straightforward when the process and the steps involved are illustrated.

It interests me that so little has changed in 2000 years of glass blowing, so many of the tools and techniques used today would be recognisable to the glass workers of yesterday.

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