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Author Topic: great-grandmother's vase - ID = Mont Joye by Legras  (Read 5232 times)

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: great-grandmother's vase - ID = Mont Joye by Legras
« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2019, 12:58:38 PM »
just to include my admiration as well - a wonderful piece showing art nouveau decoration at the height of its fame.

if I may add a little to the sound advice given so far ...    the gilding is indeed ultra thin, so perhaps not wise to do any rubbing other than a very light and dry dust, and you will need to live with whatever appearance the gold now has.           Obviously gold doesn't oxidise in a real sense, but can show a tarnished appearance if exposed to air pollutants such as open fires, tobacco smoke and cooking fumes etc., most of which, fortunately, are issues we no longer live with.           Looking at the top edges of the text block of older books, where the edges have been gilded, will show the kind of damage that gilding can suffer when not protected from such pollutants, and the top edges of books kept without protection become dull and dirty, and sadly this deterioration can't be reversed.
Although not mentioned by the others, my suggestion would be that this piece needs to be protected, within a fully enclosed cabinet etc., which hopefully will avoid any more deterioration to the gilding.

From a purely practical perspective, I would also add  -  if you don't have facilities to provide the sort of care and protection that this piece needs, and sentiment isn't necessarily high on your list, then selling this vase might be a viable option.       Of course if the piece does have massive family value then just pretend I didn't offer this suggestion. ;)

P.S.   appreciate I'm a little out of touch with modernity, but did think I knew most of the commonly used acronyms   -  but I seem to be ignorant of 'fab' - is it some sort of praiseworthy expression?

Offline glassobsessed

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Re: great-grandmother's vase - ID = Mont Joye by Legras
« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2019, 01:19:00 PM »
Fab - very fine,  short for fabulous, fabby... Has fab not been in use since the 60s?

Offline Paul S.

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Re: great-grandmother's vase - ID = Mont Joye by Legras
« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2019, 02:19:36 PM »
thanks John  -  sorry, I was only teasing, though have to say I'm ever so young and know nothing of the '60s ;)            I was reminded of the expression as I bought some Thunderbirds type toys this morning from a charity shop, and had to ask someone what fab meant.      I think the answer was that it has no real obvious meaning other than a sort of 'o.k. -  thumbs up  -  ready to go" sort of meaning  -  that's apart from the obvious 'fabulous', as you've said.          Apologies for digressing - not a cue for some week long discussion about Thunderbirds. ;D

As for acronyms - I've only just got my head round LOL, IIRC and IMHO.

Offline Cathybee

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Re: great-grandmother's vase - ID = Mont Joye by Legras
« Reply #13 on: August 30, 2019, 01:07:41 AM »
Thank you all so much for the information and good advice.  While the circumstances resulting in the vase being in my possession are sad, it is a piece I have always admired and appreciated.  i will keep on with trying to learn more about it, and look after it, in order to pass it on in good condition.

Offline Anne Tique

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Re: great-grandmother's vase - ID = Mont Joye by Legras
« Reply #14 on: August 30, 2019, 07:34:56 AM »
Paul is right about protecting this piece by displaying it in a cabinet. A perhaps cheaper alternative if you like, I don't know what these things are called in English,  you can get them in all sizes, but I would advise you to collect it rather than having it shipped. A nice touch is that you can get them from more or less the same period and it instantly creates an object of interest and if displayed in a certain way, the vase can be viewed from all angles. I would not advise this with children in the household though.

https://www.befr.ebay.be/itm/123620802993

Offline Paul S.

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Re: great-grandmother's vase - ID = Mont Joye by Legras
« Reply #15 on: August 30, 2019, 01:46:13 PM »
I think Anne's comments - plus the lady's link - are referring to a 'glass dome'.        The Victorians were passionate about such containers, not for showing vases, but more for dead/stuffed birds, sea shells, birds nests/eggs plus a variety of other colourful dead things such as butterflies and their wings etc.  -  Morpho wings were very de rigueur in the C19 for display purposes - often under glass on tea trays etc.

Much as I have respect for Anne, who has probably forgotten more about glass than I shall ever know, I disagree with Anne's suggestion of a dome for this vase  -  I think you'd be hard pressed to find a dome substantial enough to contain this vase, and I'm going to suggest a proper fully glazed cabinet instead.           I've seen domes at antiques fairs in a variety of sizes, but I think we're pushing it for this piece in view of the unusually large size.

Offline Anne Tique

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Re: great-grandmother's vase - ID = Mont Joye by Legras
« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2019, 02:33:13 PM »
Hello Paul,

It was just from a financial point of view that I mentioned this. I'm not familiar with these domes in the UK and even less in the US. Here in Belgium you see them everywhere and 60 high is nothing unusual. I have got a smaller version myself. People use them for everything now, from Christmas decorations to Tintin's rocket, they've become quite popular again, but anyway, like I said, it was just an idea.

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who has probably forgotten more about glass than I shall ever know

Surely you must have been told when you were young that you shouldn't tell any lies...

Offline Paul S.

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Re: great-grandmother's vase - ID = Mont Joye by Legras
« Reply #17 on: August 30, 2019, 03:03:42 PM »
Hi Anne  -  they still remain not uncommon in the U.K. at the better quality antiques fairs  - though whether all the examples I see are genuinely 'antique' - I doubt.       Appreciate you comments about the financial aspect, but I'm worried about the centre of gravity  -  it looks to be higher than I feel comfortable with - but provided you adopt Herod's approach regarding children then, yes, it's probably o.k.     The size of this vase is substantial, so finding a proper display cabinet is going to be expensive, but I'd imagine less expensive than a disaster with the vase.
Assume you mean 60 cms. tall ?      I'm a big fan of Herge - have many of the books.

As for lies  -  well, I'm still young and waiting to be told.  ;)         

P.S.    hope you are taking great care of that stained glass window for me. :)

Offline Anne Tique

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Re: great-grandmother's vase - ID = Mont Joye by Legras
« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2019, 01:43:45 PM »
Yes sorry Paul, 60 cm in height... I only suggested it to protect it from the elements you have mentioned but indeed, children in a household is something else, but anyway, like I said it was just a suggestion, i'll leave it with that.

Windows are all fine, thanks, even after the storms we've had here last month.

 

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