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Author Topic: Val Saint Lambert vase  (Read 977 times)

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Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Val Saint Lambert vase
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2019, 06:12:59 PM »
An IoWSG Tortoiseshell charger. Flame pontil scar, no marks, Cat.  :)
Cheers, Sue (M)

‘For every problem there is a solution: neat, plausible and wrong’. H.L.Mencken

Offline tremblas

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Re: Val Saint Lambert vase
« Reply #11 on: September 26, 2019, 10:03:44 PM »
Found in a document "Le verre et ses techniques" which I can not find references. Sorry to have to let Google do the translation.

<< Feuilles métalliques - argenture dorure
Description de la technique :
On peut utiliser de fines feuilles de métal ( or ou argent en général) pour créer un décor précieux à l’intérieur de la masse de verre. Ces feuilles peuvent être gravées d’un décor figuratif ou floral et prises en sandwich entre deux couches de verre, comme dans les techniques antiques des verres romains à double fond ou dans les verres de Bohême taillés, à double paroi, du XVIII°siècle. Cette technique se pratique essentiellement à froid, du moins dans un premier temps pour les verres romains. Mais ces feuilles peuvent également être intégrées à chaud et fusionnées dans la masse de verre, se dispersant alors en fines particules flottant dans la masse vitreuse, formant un décor abstrait. C’est cette technique qui nous occupe dans le cadre du travail à chaud et du soufflage. Les feuilles de métal sont posées sur le marbre, collées et amalgamées à une paraison roulée par le verrier, avant cueillage d’une deuxième couche de verre. La paraison est ensuite soufflée et les surfaces du métal se déchirent, en parcelles d’or ou d’argent aux contours imprécis et à l’éclat très décoratifs.
Historique de la technique :
Cette technique décorative ancestrale a été mise en oeuvre dès l’Antiquité, en Mésopotamie et dans tout le monde classique, avant même l’invention du soufflage En témoignent des flacons à parfum (alabastron) phéniciens, réalisés selon la technique d’enduction sur noyau. Après la période médiévale où elle a subi une éclipse, l’inclusion de feuilles d’or a été redécouverte à Venise lors de la Renaissance, où elle est également utilisée en complément des techniques de verre filigrané ou craquelé. Depuis elle a été surtout extrêmement appréciée et fréquemment employée par les verriers vénitiens. En France elle a été particulièrement mise en valeur dans certaines pièces de Daum, typiques des années 20. A la même époque elle conserve tout son brio à Venise dans les créations de Napoleone Martinuzzi pour Venini. Dans ses vases sobres des années 30, Carlo Scarpa revisite, entre autres techniques traditionnelles, la feuille d’or alliée au “sommerso”, de manière très subtile.Dans les années 40-50 citons les créations d’Ercole Barovier pour Barovier et Toso et les belles pièces polychromes à feuille d’or de Giulio Radi pour A.V.E.M.>>

Offline Anne Tique

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Re: Val Saint Lambert vase
« Reply #12 on: September 27, 2019, 01:41:38 AM »
Thank you for your input Tremblas, merci beaucoup!

For those of you who don't speak french, basically it explains the use,  techniques, terms and the history of using gold and/or silver leaf.
My question here though,  was about the differences of colour on my vase and what metal and cause it could have been, not knowing this changes under heat as well explained by Sue.

Just another question, just out of interest and perhaps the answer is in the question ... my vase is not clear cased, I can feel and hear the difference in the surface where the leaf is applied and where it is not. If it would have been cased, would this change of colour still have happened or would it have been less so, due to the fact that the silver was 'protected' by a layer of clear glass?

Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: Val Saint Lambert vase
« Reply #13 on: September 27, 2019, 06:28:52 AM »
If the casing glass is too hot the silver can discolour but if it have been just right it would have been bright silver. Have a look at some of the Murano glass that uses silver leaf

Offline Anne Tique

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Re: Val Saint Lambert vase
« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2019, 07:48:57 AM »
Thanks Christine, I can see what you mean, it is the effect of heat and  change of colour that is new to me. It must have been a desired effect, It has been confirmed yesterday that not many were made but it was catalogued like this.

Thank you all for your replies 🙏, you have been of great help and it is very much appreciated.

Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Val Saint Lambert vase
« Reply #15 on: September 27, 2019, 10:47:32 AM »
If the silver has remained as silver metal on the surface of a piece and a casing has been applied - and the casing does not change the colour of the silver by adding more heat and causing a reaction with the hot glass, then bright shiney silver appearance will be "protected".
Keeping the heat low enough is what "protects" the silver foil from reactions and/or burning.

my computer is doing something very strange - I suspect it is translating me into and then back out of French.
The words I type are not the ones that appear.  ???

I've found a pic I have of two IoWSG Azurene Lollipops together. One is early, with the silver sometimes reacting, sometimes remaining as silver.
The other is much later, after the experiance had been gained to get it "right" and is also treated with Stannous chloride to give it iridesence.


Cheers, Sue (M)

‘For every problem there is a solution: neat, plausible and wrong’. H.L.Mencken

Offline Anne Tique

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Re: Val Saint Lambert vase
« Reply #16 on: September 27, 2019, 10:54:27 AM »
So the answer was in the question.  8) Fascinating stuff.
Sorry to milk it, but does gold leaf  react in a similar way? …. just out of interest

Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Val Saint Lambert vase
« Reply #17 on: September 27, 2019, 11:07:15 AM »
No. Gold is inert. A noble metal, which silver is not.
Silver is the god of metals when it comes to glass. ;D
It has all sorts of weird and wonderful reactions with it - it's a subject all on its own.
(one which rather inspires me - silver is the root of all the fabulous colours in Mdina.)

I did mean to say those lollipops have gold foil on too.
(and with this strange translation going on, you have turned into a Tick on my pc Anne!  :o)
Cheers, Sue (M)

‘For every problem there is a solution: neat, plausible and wrong’. H.L.Mencken

Offline Anne Tique

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Re: Val Saint Lambert vase
« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2019, 11:15:16 AM »
Thank you Sue, very interesting indeed. After my Sam Herman pieces i'm looking very different at studio glass, and just for info, Alfred Collard and Herman have worked together at VSL.

Re your computer, you have a tablet or a laptop? You should have a language  option for your keyboard, pop-up or not.

Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Val Saint Lambert vase
« Reply #19 on: September 27, 2019, 11:28:44 AM »
I have a flat screen thingy, with a big black box beside it.
The big black box is smaller than my old grey one. There's another flat white thingy, with sticks poking up from it and some green lights, and a load of weirdly placed little holes in it.
I don't think it's a laptop OR a tablet. :)
It's not set up enough for me to find any "options". I wouldn't know what they were or what to do with them.

Silver was very much used in early Studio Glass, Anne. It was before the days of health and safety, they didn't know how dangerous it was to be breathing in silver gas fumes while working with it - and chlorine gas from the chloride.
I think a fair few of us suspect Michael Harris' death from emphysema might have been because of his exposure to this.
Cheers, Sue (M)

‘For every problem there is a solution: neat, plausible and wrong’. H.L.Mencken

 

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